Flinders University Flinders Academic Commons
 

Flinders Academic Commons >
Flinders Digital Archive >
School of Medicine >
Greater Green Triangle University Department of Rural Health >
Greater Green Triangle - Collected Works >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2328/26331

Title: The association of levels of physical activity with metabolic syndrome in rural Australian adults
Authors: Vaughan, Clare Maree
Schoo, Adrian Martinus M
Janus, Edward Denis
Philpot, Benjamin Joel
Davis-Lameloise, Nathalie
Lo, Sing Kai
Laatikainen, Tiina K M
Vartiainen, Erkki
Dunbar, James Anthony
Keywords: Public health
Rural areas
Physical activity
Metabolic syndrome
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Citation: Vaughan, C.M., Schoo, A.M., Janus, E.D., Philpot, B.J., Davis-Lamaloise, N., Kai-Lo, S., Laatikainen, T.K., Vartiainen, E., & Dunbar, J.A., 2009. The association of levels of physical activity with metabolic syndrome in rural Australian adults. BMC Public Health, 9:273 (31 July 2009).
Abstract: Physical activity (PA) reduces risk factors related to metabolic syndrome. Rurality influences the way people incorporate physical activity into daily life. The aim of this study is to determine the association of PA level with metabolic syndrome in a rural Australian population. The influence of adiposity on these associations is also investigated. Three cross-sectional population health surveys were conducted in south-east Australia during 2004–2006 using a random population sample (n = 1563, participation rate 49%) aged 25–74 years. PA was assessed via a self-administered questionnaire, and components of the metabolic syndrome via anthropometric measurements taken by specially trained nurses and laboratory tests. Approximately one-fifth of participants were inactive in leisure-time and over one-third had metabolic syndrome (men 39%, women 33%; p = 0.022). There was an inverse association between level of PA and metabolic syndrome (p < 0.001). Men who were inactive in leisure-time were more than twice as likely and women more than three times as likely to have metabolic syndrome compared with those having high PA. Body mass index (BMI) is a mediating factor in the association between level of PA and metabolic syndrome. Some PA is better than none if adults, particularly women, are to reduce their risk of metabolic syndrome and associated vascular diseases. Specialised interventions that take rurality into consideration are recommended for adults who are inactive.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2328/26331
ISSN: 1471-2458
Appears in Collections:Greater Green Triangle - Collected Works

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Vaughan Association.pdf310.03 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback