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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2328/637

Title: Big Bad Business. "Bad Company: The Cult of the CEO" by Gideon Haigh and "The Big End of Town: Big Business and Corporate Leadership in Twentieth-Century Australia" by Grant Fleming, David Merrett and Simon Ville. [review]
Authors: Walsh, Richard
Keywords: Australian
Book Reviews
Publishing
Richard Walsh
business
Eugene O'Neill
T.S. Eliot
Ray Williams
HIH
One.Tel
Helen Darville
Ern Malley
American
George Trumbull
AMP
Al Dunlap
family capitalism
Fairfax
David Jones
Arnotts
Pontiac
John DeLorean
Lee Iacocca
Chrysler
Rupert Murdoch
Butlin, Barnard and Pincus
Government and Capitalism
Garfield Barwick
Trade Practices Act
Australian Competition and Consumer Commission Act
Allan Fels
financial deregulation
Chris Corrigan
Michael Chaney
BHP
Peter Drucker
Dave Leckie
Peter Smedley
John Fletcher
Andrew Mohl
David Morgan
Issue Date: Apr-2004
Publisher: Australian Book Review
Citation: Walsh, Richard 2004. Big Bad Business. Review of "Bad Company: The Cult of the CEO" by Gideon Haigh and "The Big End of Town: Big Business and Corporate Leadership in Twentieth-Century Australia" by Grant Fleming, David Merrett and Simon Ville. 'Australian Book Review', No 260, April, 16-17.
Series/Report no.: No. 260
Abstract: As Australians, we seem to be much more comfortable acknowledging the role of an orchestra’s conductor or a film’s producer or a sporting team’s captain than we are at accepting the pivotal role of a brilliant CEO. It is as though we fear that when we advocate ‘leadership’ we are somehow admitting to neo-fascist tendencies. It is perhaps best to remember that the despotic megalomaniac is only one model of leadership on offer. These two books should be read together, and are in fact perfect foils for each other. "The Big End of Town" is scholarly and perhaps too willing to give Big Business the benefit of the doubt; "Bad Company" is a rollicking good read, as combative and provocative as any reader could reasonably demand.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2328/637
ISSN: 0155-2864
Appears in Collections:No 260 - April, 2004

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