Recent Submissions

  • Irony in R.A.K. Mason's Poetry 

    Daalder, Joost (Taylor & Francis, 1982)
    Previously, the author has presented R.A.K. Mason as essentially a sensitive modern romantic at odds with the New Zealand where he spent his life from 1905-1971, and with, in a larger sense, not only man but also the ...
  • R.A.K. Mason: The Poet as a Pacific Christ 

    Daalder, Joost (Centre for Research in the New Literatures in English, Flinders University, 1981)
    The vast majority of Mason's poems derive their individual character not only from his use of language, but also, and above all, from his perceiving of himself as a Christ in New Zealand, ignored and victimised by a society ...
  • R.A.K. Mason's Universality 

    Daalder, Joost (Rinsen Books, Kyoto, 1998)
    Mason is writing about the plight of man, trapped in a hostile place, i.e. our planet, which, in the space of the universe as a whole, is 'fixed at the friendless outer edge'. Even if perhaps a poet in an isolated country ...
  • The Religious Experience in R.A.K. Mason's Poetry 

    Daalder, Joost (Editions Rodopi, 1996)
    When I first read R.A.K. Mason's poems several years ago, I was inclined to see the Christ figure in them as essentially - or at least most frequently - a reflection of the author himself, in the role of a victim of his ...
  • Ambiguity and Ambivalence in R.A.K. Mason 

    Daalder, Joost (Kunapipi, 1983)
    The author examines one of R.A.K. Mason's best known poems, Ecce Homunculus, with concern for some of the poem's ambiguities and the possibility that they reveal ambivalence, or at least a richness of meaning, rather than ...
  • R.A.K. Mason and the Passing of Time 

    Daalder, Joost (Caxton Press, 1981)
    R. A. K. Mason (1905-71) is a hauntingly impressive poet who not only shows himself acutely aware of where he is as someone who `Burnt Dian's temple down at Otahuhu' (with an imagination reaching beyond a geographical ...