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dc.contributor.authorNeilson, Heather
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-18T07:40:54Z
dc.date.available2006-09-18T07:40:54Z
dc.date.issued2003-03
dc.identifier.citationNeilson, Heather 2003. The Albertine Motif. Review of "The French Tutor" by Judith Armstrong. 'Australian Book Review', No 249, March, 62.en
dc.identifier.issn0155-2864
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/1282
dc.description.abstractThe protagonist of Judith Armstrong's first novel, Emily King, is beautiful, blonde and bilingual, having spent several early years in Paris. As an undergraduate, she suffers disillusionment when her hopes for a burgeoning romantic relationship prove to be illusory. Thereafter, she determines to adopt a strictly utilitarian approach to sexual relations, at one point adroitly juggling three complementarily useful boyfriends. A recurring minatory motif is Emily's favourite flower, a rose of French origin called the Albertine. The brevity of its orange-pink blooming is symbolic in this narrative of the transitional nature of relationships - a warning that it is folly to trust a lover too much or too quickly, lest one is betrayed.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralia Council, La Trobe University, National Library of Australia, Holding Redlich, Arts Victoriaen
dc.format.extent308657 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAustralian Book Reviewen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo 249en
dc.subjectAustralianen
dc.subjectBook Reviewsen
dc.subjectPublishingen
dc.subject.otherAustralian Standard Research Classification > 420200 Literature Studies > 420202 Australia and New Zealanden
dc.titleThe Albertine Motif. "The French Tutor" by Judith Armstrong. [review]en
dc.typeArticleen


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