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dc.contributor.authorSwalwell, Melanie Lorraine
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-27T07:04:45Z
dc.date.available2010-07-27T07:04:45Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationSwalwell, M L, 2003. Multi-Player Computer Gaming: 'Better than playing (PC Games) with yourself'. Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture, 3(4).en
dc.identifier.issn1547-4348
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/14292
dc.identifier.urihttp://reconstruction.eserver.org/034/swalwell.htm
dc.description.abstractBased on research conducted with a multiplayer gaming group, this article introduces and critically outlines the phenomenon of "lanning," the practice where computer game players get together to play each other over a local area network or LAN. Swalwell argues that lanning presents a significant challenge to a number of ingrained assumptions about computer gaming. Primary amongst these is that lanning entails players meeting, not just in the virtual world of a game, but also face to face, dealing a blow to theories that gamers are anti-social. Swalwell goes on to argue that the sociality of this form of gameplay also highlights the paucity of a range of other, binary assumptions, in particular about what it is to encounter a game, and to "enter" virtual environments. Attention is focussed on some of the different negotiations that lanning involves - particularly across and between a range of materiality and reality statuses - and the implications of negotiations such as these for subjectivity.en
dc.titleMulti-Player Computer Gaming: 'Better than playing (PC Games) with yourself'en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.rmid2006010642
dc.subject.forgroup2002 Cultural Studiesen
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupSwalwell, Melanie Lorraine: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1873-3478en_US


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