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dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Kate
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-08T03:44:51Z
dc.date.available2007-05-08T03:44:51Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/1490
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, Kate Douglas explores one of the ways in which life narratives of trauma are circulating in contemporary Australian cultural landscapes: through the internet. Using the example of the Bali bombings, Dr Douglas wants to consider the role internet media have played in traumatic remembering and commemoration. Like many (actual) commemorative sites, these websites foreground life narratives in their representation of the traumatic event: testimonies from first- and second-person witnesses, photographs, poems and letters that assume significance beyond the individual. These narratives function as metonyms for survivors’ experiences.en
dc.format.extent260673 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectresearchen
dc.subject.otherlife writingen
dc.titleCyber-Commemoration: Life Writing, Trauma and Memorialisation. [abstract].en
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.rights.licenseIn Copyright


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