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dc.contributor.authorDwivedi, Vivek Kumar
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-28T23:20:40Z
dc.date.available2010-10-28T23:20:40Z
dc.date.issued2010-10-28T23:20:40Z
dc.identifier.issn1836-4845
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/15098
dc.descriptionPeer-reviewed article.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper attempts to establish the identity of something that is often considered to be missing – a living Indian critical tradition. I refer to the tradition that arises out of the work of those Indians who write in English. The chief architects of this tradition are Sri Aurobindo, C.D. Narasimhaiah, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Homi K. Bhabha. It is possible to believe that Indian literary theories derive almost solely from ancient Sanskrit poetics. Or, alternatively, one can be concerned about the sad state of affairs regarding Indian literary theories or criticism in English. There have been scholars who have raised the question of the pathetic state of Indian scholarship in English and have even come up with some positive suggestions. But these scholars are those who are ignorant about the living Indian critical tradition. The significance of the Indian critical tradition lies in the fact that it provides the real focus to the Indian critical scene. Without an awareness of this tradition Indian literary scholarship (which is quite a different thing from Indian literary criticism and theory as it does not have the same impact as the latter two do) can easily fail to see who the real Indian literary critics and theorists are.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectIndian critical traditionen
dc.subjectIndiaen
dc.subjectCriticismen
dc.subjectSri Aurobindoen
dc.subjectC.D. Narasimhaiahen
dc.subjectGayatri Chakravorty Spivaken
dc.subjectHomi K. Bhabhaen
dc.subjectIndian literatureen
dc.subjectLiterary theoryen
dc.titleThe Living Indian Critical Traditionen
dc.typeArticleen


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