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dc.contributor.authorRosenthal, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-08T02:23:26Z
dc.date.available2008-04-08T02:23:26Z
dc.date.issued2002-06
dc.identifier.citationRosenthal, Tom 2002. Patrick White, Sidney Nolan and Me. 'Australian Book Review', No 242, June/July, 39-42.en
dc.identifier.issn0155-2864
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/1805
dc.description.abstractOne evening in 1957 I tuned into the Third Programme and caught a dramatised excerpt from a book. It was a party scene in which the authorial tone was so sardonic, and the petty snobberies and pretensions of nineteenth-century Australian society so hilariously exposed, that I knew I wanted to read it. The book was "Voss", by Patrick White. Since I was a penniless undergraduate at the time, I borrowed it from the local public library and did not actually possess a copy until my mother gave me one for Christmas two years later. Thus I became a confirmed White addict. In 1960, while working at the art book publishers Thames & Hudson on the first ever book about him, written by Kenneth Clark, Colin MacInnes and Bryan Robertson, I met Sidney Nolan and a friendship soon grew, culminating some four decades later with my writing my own book about Nolan and seeing it published recently [see Jaynie Anderson’s review in ABR, April 2002]. In the early 1960s I also met the flamboyant Australian man of letters Max Harris. Man of letters is an old-fashioned description but the only one that will do for a man who was a poet, a critic, a bookseller and remainder dealer, and a founding editor and publisher of the leading Australian intellectual magazine of the 1940s and 1950s "Angry Penguins".en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAustralian Book Reviewen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo 242en
dc.subjectAustralia -- Cultureen
dc.subjectAuthorsen
dc.titlePatrick White, Sidney Nolan and Me.en
dc.typeArticleen


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