Now showing items 1-20 of 29

    • Is Jave-la-Grande Australia? The Linguistic Evidence Concerning the West Coast 

      Richardson, W A R (The Globe, 1983)
      Alexander Dalrymple was by no means alone in assuming that Jave-la-Grande was Australia. James Burney stated that he found too many similarities between the east coast of Jave-la-Grande and the then known outline of ...
    • Jave-la-Grande: A Place Name Chart of its East Coast 

      Richardson, W A R (The Great Circle, Australian Association for Maritime History, 1984)
      The Harleian and other Dieppe maps made in France in the mid-16th century are manifestly based on Portuguese originals, yet no surviving Portuguese maps show any evidence of this mysterious landmass. Suggestions that the ...
    • Review of Lawrence Fitzgerald, Java La Grande: The Portuguese Discovery of Australia, Hobart: The Publishers Pty Ltd, 1984 

      Richardson, W A R (The Great Circle. Australian Association for Maritime History, 1985)
      In this book Brigadier Fitzgerald summarises the arguments for and against the identification of the apparent continent of Jave-la-Grande as Australia, as provided by some, but by no means all of those who have written on ...
    • The Portuguese Discovery of Australia: Fact or Fiction? 

      Richardson, W A R (National Library of Australia, 1989)
      The Dutch, under Willem Janszoon in the Duyfken, and the British, under James Cook in the Endeavour, have long been known to have reached Australia's shores in 1606 and 1770 respectively. For more than two centuries a ...
    • An Indian Ocean Pilgrimage in Search of an Island 

      Richardson, W A R (The Great Circle. Australian Association for Maritime History, 1989)
      As late as 1817, a chart of the Indian Ocean by L.S. de la Rochette was published in London by William Faden and approved by the Chart Committee of the British Admiralty. Among the numerous fascinating features on it is ...
    • The Origin of Place-Names on Maps 

      Richardson, W A R (The Map Collector, 1991)
      Many inscriptions on early maps and charts present problems of meaning and identity which can only be resolved beyond reasonable doubt by tracing them back to their earliest recorded appearance and reducing the risk of ...
    • Lyonesse and The Wolf: A Case Study in Place-Name Corruption 

      Richardson, W A R (The English Place-Name Society, University of Nottingham, 1992)
      A valuable, though seldom exploited, source of place-name research material is that provided by early manuscript and printed maps and charts, and sailing directions or rutters. Most, if not all, of the earliest maps and ...
    • Toponymy and the History of Cartography 

      Richardson, W A R (Royal Australian Historical Society, 1992)
      Within the last few years historians of cartography have become increasingly aware of the potential value of toponymy for the elucidation of early cartographical enigmas. One of the most notorious of these is the real ...
    • Mercator's Southern Continent 

      Richardson, W A R (The Globe. The Australian Map Circle, 1992)
      The age-old concept that a vast southern landmass must of necessity exist to counterbalance that in the northern hemisphere was given graphic expression by many cartographers, including Ptolemy, Johannes Schoener and Oronce ...
    • Jave-La-Grande is not Australia 

      Richardson, W A R (The Globe. The Australian Map Circle, 1992)
      The continent of Jave-la-Grande on the mid-16th century manuscript Dieppe maps has been the subject of much speculation for over two hundred years and has been claimed to provide evidence of an early Portuguese discovery ...
    • Three Sixteenth Century Indian Ocean Shipwrecks: Maps as Historical Evidence 

      Richardson, W A R (The Flinders University of South Australia, 1992)
      For two centuries the landmass named Jave-la-Grande, which appears south of Indonesia on a number of French manuscript world maps made between 1542 and 1566, has been claimed by some to be an early map of Australia, owing ...
    • Cartographical Clues to Three Sixteenth-Century Shipwrecks in the Indian Ocean 

      Richardson, W A R (The Great Circle. Australian Association for Maritime History, 1992)
      Recent place-name studies dealt with two variant, migratory inscriptions: the island of los romeros, actually Amsterdam Island in the southern Indian Ocean; and Psitacorum regio ('The Region of Parrots'), on a fictitious ...
    • The Smalls, Hats and Barrels: Navigational and Toponymic Hazards 

      Richardson, W A R (Nomina. The Society for Name Studies in Britain and Ireland, 1994)
      The earliest surviving manuscript charts which include reasonably legible inscriptions around the more southerly coastlines of the British Isles are by Italian or Majorcan/Catalan cartographers of the late thirteenth and ...
    • A Critique of Spanish and Portuguese Claims to Have Discovered Australia 

      Richardson, W A R (Investigator. Geelong Historical Society, 1995)
      Claims that the Spanish and especially the Portuguese discovered Australia before the Dutch and English have gained a good deal of credence since they were first advanced. The matter is of some interest to the Geelong area ...
    • A Cartographical Nightmare - Manuel de Godinho de Eredia's Search for India Meridional 

      Richardson, W A R (Center for Portuguese Studies, University of California Santa Barbara, 1995)
      The author examines the writings and maps of Manuel Godinho de Eredia from the early 1600s, and concludes that Eredia's "increasingly contradictory and far-fetched written and cartographical portrayals of India Meridional" ...
    • Northampton on the Welsh Coast? Some Fifteenth and Sixteenth-Century Sailing Directions 

      Richardson, W A R (Cambrian Archaeological Association, 1995)
      Those fourteenth-, fifteenth- and sixteenth-century mariners who were literate almost certainly relied much more upon sailing directions than upon charts. A mere glance at some of the earliest surviving charts of areas ...
    • Coastal Place-Name Enigmas on Early Charts and in Early Sailing Directions 

      Richardson, W A R (The English Place-Name Society, 1997)
      Those 14th, 15th, and 16th century mariners who could read almost certainly relied much more upon sailing directions (Rutters) than upon charts. Illiterate ones relied mainly upon practical experience, the lead-line and ...
    • Enigmatic Indian Ocean Coastlines on Early Maps and Charts 

      Richardson, W A R (The Globe. The Australian Map Circle, 1998)
      Maps by early non-Iberian cartographers tended to rely heavily on Ptolemy's hopelessly inaccurate maps, and on a literal acceptance of Marco Polo's unreliable, second-hand writings. The identification of dubious, frequently ...
    • 'Imaginography': Sensational Pseudo-Discoveries 

      Richardson, W A R (The Skeptic, 1999)
      The latter half of the 20th century has witnessed a veritable spate of reports in the press about the finding of historical artifacts concerning whose significance sensational claims have been made.
    • 'Imaginography': sensational pseudo-discoveries 

      Richardson, W A R (Geography Teachers' Association of South Australia, 1999)
      The latter half of the 20th century has witnessed a veritable spate of reports in the press about the finding of historical artifacts concerning whose significance sensational claims have been made.