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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, W A R
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-23T23:27:59Z
dc.date.available2011-11-23T23:27:59Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationRichardson, W.A.R. 2001. A Non-Existent Continent. The Skeptic, 21 (4), 58-62.en
dc.identifier.issn0726-9897
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/25696
dc.description.abstractToo many people today expect early maps and charts of newly discovered lands to have similar standards of accuracy. They are unaware of how incredibly inaccurate many were. Information from different sources could be combined, with no consistency of scale. Many coastlines, such as those of Mercator's southern continent, were but imaginative, graphic representations of written descriptions. Only the inscriptions can confirm what the cartographer concerned was depicting, or thought he was depicting.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe Skepticen
dc.subjectMaritime historyen
dc.subjectMaritime navigationen
dc.subjectCartographyen
dc.subjectMapmakingen
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.subjectBill Richardsonen
dc.titleA Non-Existent Continenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.licenseIn Copyright


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