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dc.contributor.authorWillis, Eileen Mary
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-27T02:45:36Z
dc.date.available2012-09-27T02:45:36Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationWillis, E., 2010. Expressive phenomenology and critical approaches in the classroom: process and risks for students of health sciences. ergo, 1(3), 45-52.en
dc.identifier.issn1835-6850
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/26318
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the use of expressive phenomenological and critical approaches to the teaching of health policy to a large class of first year health professional students studying both internally and through distance education. The phenomenological approach to classroom teaching attempts to provide students with opportunities to immerse themselves in the lived experiences of populations and individuals who are ill and in need of care. The critical approach brings the political, social and cultural realities of professional practice into the classroom discussion and reflection. The transition from the expressive phenomenological to critical analysis requires careful management by the teacher when reacting to the mood, responses and capacities of students. Managing these processes online for students studying at a distance presents additional pedagogical issues. These are: the problem of capturing ‘real time’ mood, managing the chaos of multiple student narratives, allowing time to dwell on the phenomena and dealing with the impact of violent films.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Adelaideen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectTeaching and learningen
dc.titleExpressive phenomenology and critical approaches in the classroom: process and risks for students of health sciencesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.rmid2006014602
dc.rights.licenseIn Copyright
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupWillis, Eileen Mary: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7576-971Xen_US


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