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dc.contributor.authorDingwall, Kylie M
dc.contributor.authorPinkerton, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorLindeman, Melissa
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-28T01:16:43Z
dc.date.available2013-03-28T01:16:43Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-31
dc.identifier.citationDingwall, K.M., Pinkerton, J. and Lindeman, M., 2013. "People like numbers": a descriptive study of cognitive assessment methods in clinical practice for Aboriginal Australians in the Northern Territory. BMC Psychiatry, 13:42.en
dc.identifier.govdocThis paper was supported by a Training Fellowship for Indigenous Australian Health Research from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.en
dc.identifier.issn1471-244X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/26662
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-244X/13/42
dc.description.abstractAchieving culturally fair assessments of cognitive functioning for Aboriginal people is difficult due to a scarcity of appropriately validated tools for use with this group. As a result, some Aboriginal people with cognitive impairments may lack fair and equitable access to services. The objective of this study was to examine current clinical practice in the Northern Territory regarding cognitive assessment for Aboriginal people thereby providing some guidance for clinicians new to this practice setting. Conclusions Cognitive tests developed specifically for Aboriginal people are urgently needed. In the absence of appropriate, validated tests, clinicians have relied on and modified a range of standardised and informal assessments, whilst recognising the severe limitations of these. Past clinical training has not prepared clinicians adequately for assessing Aboriginal clients, and experience and clinical judgment were considered crucial for fair interpretation of test scores. Interpretation guidelines may assist inexperienced clinicians to consider whether they are achieving fair assessments of cognition for Aboriginal clients.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper was supported by a Training Fellowship for Indigenous Australian Health Research from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.subjectPublic healthen
dc.subjectAboriginal peoplesen
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.title"People like numbers": a descriptive study of cognitive assessment methods in clinical practice for Aboriginal Australians in the Northern Territoryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.relation.grantnumberNHMRC/notfound
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-13-42en


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