Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMahood, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-15T05:22:33Z
dc.date.available2013-08-15T05:22:33Z
dc.date.issued2002-10
dc.identifier.citationMahood, Kim 2002.Beyond the Pale. Review of “Black Sheep: Journey to Borroloola” by Nicholas Jose. 'Australian Book Review', No 245, October, 15-16.en
dc.identifier.issn0155-2864
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/26965
dc.description.abstractAt the book's heart is the concern for connections, to country and to people, a concern that haunts many Australians, particularly those who have been insulated from the legacies of the frontier. As those legacies make themselves felt in the wider community, as the evidence is manifest that the border between black and white has been crossed since the beginning, and the descendants of those clandestine crossings articulate a louder and louder claim to be heard, books such as “Black Sheep” are an essential part of the conversation, the attempt to keep a dialogue going across the faultline.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralia Council, La Trobe University, National Library of Australia, Holding Redlich, Arts Victoriaen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAustralian Book Reviewen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo 245en
dc.subjectAustralianen
dc.subjectBook Reviewsen
dc.subjectPublishingen
dc.subjectBorroloola, Aboriginal, Black, White, pale, Ernestine Hill, Douglas Lockwood, Roger Jose, Adelaide, Nicolas Jose, Australian, Bill Harney, Henry James, Ted Egan, Matthew Flinders, Murandoo Yanner, Alejo Carpentier’s, “Black Sheep”, Journeyen
dc.subject.otherAustralian Standard Research Classification > 420200 Literature Studies > 420202 Australian and New Zealanden
dc.titleBeyond the Pale. “Black Sheep: Journey to Borroloola” by Nicholas Jose. [review]en
dc.typeArticleen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record