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dc.contributor.authorCurtis, David D
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Mike Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-30T04:26:32Z
dc.date.available2008-08-30T04:26:32Z
dc.date.issued2002-11
dc.identifier.citationCurtis David & Lawson Michael J (2002) Computer adventure games as problem-solving environments. International Education Journal 3(4)en
dc.identifier.issn1443-1475
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/3116
dc.description.abstractClaims that computer-based adventure games are productive environments for the development of general problem-solving ability were tested in a study of 40 students' interactions with a novel computer-based adventure game. Two sets of factors that are thought to influence problem-solving performance were identified in the literature – domain-specific knowledge (schema) and general problem-solving strategies. Measures of both domain-specific knowledge and general strategy use were developed and applied in the study. A cognitive model to explain performance is developed in which there are complex relationships among key concepts. General strategies were found to have important influences on problem-solving performance, but schema was negatively related to performance. The implications of these findings for both classroom practice and future research designs are discussed. [Author abstract]en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherShannon Research Pressen
dc.subjectComputer gamesen
dc.subjectProblem solvingen
dc.subjectSchemata (Cognition)en
dc.titleComputer adventure games as problem-solving environmentsen
dc.typeArticleen
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupCurtis, David D: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1192-0163en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupLawson, Mike Joseph: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0175-3683en_US


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