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dc.contributor.authorTravis, Lee
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Nicholas John
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-10T04:57:30Z
dc.date.available2015-02-10T04:57:30Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.identifier.citationTravis L and Spencer N J (2013) Imaging stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings in mouse colon. Frontiers in Neuroscience 7:179.en
dc.identifier.issn1662-453X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/35203
dc.descriptionThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en
dc.description.abstractSpinal afferent neurons play a major role in detecting noxious and innocuous stimuli from visceral organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract. However, all our understanding about spinal afferents has been obtained from recordings of spinal afferent axons, or cell bodies that lie outside the gut wall, or peripheral organ they innervate. No recordings have been made directly from spinal afferent nerve endings, which is where sensory transduction occurs. We developed a preparation whereby recordings could be made from rectal afferent nerve endings in the colon, to characterize mechanisms underlying sensory transduction. Dorsal root ganglia (L6-S2) were removed from mice, whilst retaining neural continuity with the colon. Fluo-4-AM was used to record from rectal afferent nerve endings in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle at 36°C. In slack (unstretched) preparations of colon, no calcium transients were recorded from spinal afferent endings. However, in response to a maintained increase in circumferential diameter, a maintained discharge of calcium transients occurred simultaneously in multiple discrete varicosities along single axons of rectal afferents in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle. Stretch-activated calcium transients were resistant to hexamethonium and nifedipine, but were abolished by tetrodotoxin, CPA, BAPTA-AM, cobalt, gadolinium, or replacement of extracellular Na+ with NMDG. In summary, we present a novel preparation in which stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings can be recorded, using calcium imaging. We show that circumferential stretch of the colon activates a maintained discharge of calcium transients simultaneously in varicosities along single rectal afferent endings in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle. Non-selective cation channels, TTX-sensitive Na+ channels and both extracellular calcium influx and intracellular Ca2+ stores are required for stretch-activated calcium transients in rectal afferent endings.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFrontiersen
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1025766en
dc.rights© 2013 Travis and Spencer.en
dc.subjectSpinal afferent neuronsen
dc.subjectColonen
dc.titleImaging stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings in mouse colonen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.relation.grantnumberNHMRC/1025766en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2013.00179en
dc.rights.holderTravis and Spencer.en
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY


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