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dc.contributor.authorOster, Candice
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Julie Anne
dc.contributor.authorLawn, Sharon Joy
dc.contributor.authorReed, Richard Lewis
dc.contributor.authorDawson, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorMuir-Cochrane, Eimear Caitlin
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Jeffrey
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-27T00:49:33Z
dc.date.available2016-06-27T00:49:33Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationOster C, Henderson J, Lawn S, Reed R, Dawson S, Muir-Cochrane E, Fuller J. Fragmentation in Australian Commonwealth and South Australian State policy on mental health and older people: A governmentality analysis. Health (London). 2016 May 4. pii: 1363459316644490.en
dc.identifier.issn1363-4593
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/36188
dc.descriptionThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page(https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).en
dc.description.abstractMental health care for older people is a significant and growing issue in Australia and internationally. This article describes how older people’s mental health is governed through policy discourse by examining Australian Commonwealth and South Australian State government policy documents, and commentaries from professional groups, advocacy groups and non-governmental organisations. Documents published between 2009 and 2014 were analysed using a governmentality approach, informed by Foucault. Discourses of ‘risk’, ‘ageing as decline/dependence’ and ‘healthy ageing’ were identified. Through these discourses, different neo-liberal governmental strategies are applied to ‘target’ groups according to varying risk judgements. Three policy approaches were identified where older people are (1) absent from policy, (2) governed as responsible, active citizens or (3) governed as passive recipients of health care. This fragmented policy response to older people’s mental health reflects fragmentation in the Australian policy environment. It constructs an ambiguous place for older people within neo-liberal governmental rationality, with significant effects on the health system, older people and their carers.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen
dc.rightsCopyright 2016 The Authorsen
dc.titleFragmentation in Australian Commonwealth and South Australian State policy on mental health and older people: A governmentality analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1363459316644490en
dc.rights.holderThe Authorsen
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupLawn, Sharon Joy: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5464-8887en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupHenderson, Julie Anne: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8697-5460en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupReed, Richard Lewis: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5115-4726en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupMuir-Cochrane, Eimear Caitlin: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5036-4908en_US


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