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dc.contributor.authorReznik, J E
dc.contributor.authorBiros, E
dc.contributor.authorMilanese, S
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Susan J
dc.contributor.authorLamont, A
dc.contributor.authorGalea, M P
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-29T23:53:55Z
dc.date.available2017-03-29T23:53:55Z
dc.date.issued2015-01
dc.identifier.citationReznik, J., Biros, E., Milanese, S., Gordon, S., Lamont, A., & Galea, M. (2015). Prevalence of neurogenic heterotopic ossification in traumatic head- and spinal-injured patients admitted to a tertiary referral hospital in Australia. 34(1), 54.en
dc.identifier.issn1525-5794
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37035
dc.descriptionThis article made available in accordance with Wolters Kluwer author's permission requirements. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Incen
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate the prevalence of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) admitted to non-specialised units. Subjects and Method: Retrospective audit of patients, using the ICD-10-AM coding system, admitted to The Townsville Hospital (TTH) with TBI/TSCI between 1 July 2006 and 31 December 2012. Results: 58 patients with length of stay (LOS) ≥60 days were admitted to TTH with TBI/TSCI over this period; mean age 60 years (range 31-87 years); (55 were TBI and 3 TSCI patients). 3114 TBI/TSCI patients with LOS <60 days and mean age of 43 years (range 18-93years) were also identified (2903 were TBI and 211 TSCI patients). Overall, none were diagnosed with NHO; six patients, identified by the ICD-AM-10 codes, diagnosed with heterotopic ossification (HO) did not have an associated TBI/TSCI. Conclusion: Findings of zero percent of NHO prevalence in TSCI/TBI patients admitted to the large tertiary referral hospital suggest that NHO may have been missed, possibly due to the TSCI/TBI ICD-10-AM codes, not being specifically designed for documentation of the TBI/TSCI complications. If NHO remains undiagnosed in non-specialised units due to the method of coding, it may increase functional limitation in already compromised individuals.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWolters Kluwer Health, Incen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Incen
dc.titlePrevalence of Neurogenic Heterotopic Ossification in Traumatic Head- and Spinal-Injured Patients Admitted to a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Australiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1097/HCM.0000000000000044en
dc.rights.holderWolters Kluwer Health, Incen


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