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dc.contributor.authorRidgway, J
dc.contributor.authorHickson, L
dc.contributor.authorLind, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T01:32:10Z
dc.date.available2017-04-05T01:32:10Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-11
dc.identifier.citationJason Ridgway, Louise Hickson & Christopher Lind (2016): Decision-making and outcomes of hearing help-seekers: A self-determination theory perspective, International Journal of Audiology, DOI: 10.3109/14992027.2015.1120893en
dc.identifier.issn1708-8186
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37081
dc.descriptionThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.description.abstractObjective: To explore the explanatory power of a self-determination theory (SDT) model of health behaviour change for hearing aid adoption decisions and fitting outcomes. Design: A quantitative approach was taken for this longitudinal cohort study. Participants completed questionnaires adapted from SDT that measured autonomous motivation, autonomy support, and perceived competence for hearing aids. Hearing aid fitting outcomes were obtained with the international outcomes inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA). Sociodemographic and audiometric information was collected. Study sample: Participants were 216 adult first-time hearing help-seekers (125 hearing aid adopters, 91 non-adopters). Results: Regression models assessed the impact of autonomous motivation and autonomy support on hearing aid adoption and hearing aid fitting outcomes. Sociodemographic and audiometric factors were also taken into account. Autonomous motivation, but not autonomy support, was associated with increased hearing aid adoption. Autonomy support was associated with increased perceived competence for hearing aids, reduced activity limitation and increased hearing aid satisfaction. Autonomous motivation was positively associated with hearing aid satisfaction. Conclusion: The SDT model is potentially useful in understanding how hearing aid adoption decisions are made, and how hearing health behaviour is internalized and maintained over time. Autonomy supportive practitioners may improve outcomes by helping hearing aid adopters maintain internalized change.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Groupen
dc.rights© 2016 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.en
dc.subjectself-determination theory (SDT)en
dc.subjecthearing aiden
dc.subjectHearing aid fittingen
dc.subjecthearing impairment (HI)en
dc.subjectmotivation,en
dc.subjecthearing aid adoptionen
dc.subjectautonomyen
dc.subjectautonomy support,en
dc.titleDecision-making and outcomes of hearing help-seekers: A self-determination theory perspectiveen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)en
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupLind, Christopher: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5968-9322en_US


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