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dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Toby
dc.contributor.authorBaum, Fran
dc.contributor.authorLawless, Angela Patricia
dc.contributor.authorLabonte, R
dc.contributor.authorSanders, D
dc.contributor.authorBoffa, John
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, T
dc.contributor.authorJavanparast, Sara
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-06T03:27:02Z
dc.date.available2017-04-06T03:27:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-02
dc.identifier.citationFreeman, Toby, et al. "Case Study of an Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Service in Australia: Universal, Rights-Based, Publicly Funded Comprehensive Primary Health Care in Action." Health & Human Rights: An International Journal 18.2 (2016).en
dc.identifier.issn1079-0969
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37104
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.description.abstractUniversal health coverage provides a framework to achieve health services coverage but does not articulate the model of care desired. Comprehensive primary health care includes promotive, preventive, curative, and rehabilitative interventions and health equity and health as a human right as central goals. In Australia, Aboriginal community-controlled health services have pioneered comprehensive primary health care since their inception in the early 1970s. Our five-year project on comprehensive primary health care in Australia partnered with six services, including one Aboriginal community-controlled health service, the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress. Our findings revealed more impressive outcomes in several areas—multidisciplinary work, community participation, cultural respect and accessibility strategies, preventive and promotive work, and advocacy and intersectoral collaboration on social determinants of health—at the Aboriginal community-controlled health service compared to the other participating South Australian services (state-managed and nongovernmental ones). Because of these strengths, the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress’s community-controlled model of comprehensive primary health care deserves attention as a promising form of implementation of universal health coverage by articulating a model of care based on health as a human right that pursues the goal of health equity.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 Freeman, Baum, Lawless, Labonté, Sanders, Boffa, Edwards, and Javanparast.en
dc.subjectUniversal health coverageen
dc.subjectprimary health careen
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.titleCase Study of an Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Service in Australia: Universal, Rights-Based, Publicly Funded Comprehensive Primary Health Care in Actionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderFreeman, Baum, Lawless, Labonté, Sanders, Boffa, Edwards, and Javanparast.en
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupFreeman, Toby: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2787-8580en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupLawless, Angela Patricia: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0718-8088en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupJavanparast, Sara: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0388-5524en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupBaum, Fran: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2294-1368en_US


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