Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDiment, Laura
dc.contributor.authorHobbs, David Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-11T02:22:16Z
dc.date.available2017-07-11T02:22:16Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-28
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Assistive, Rehabilitative & Therapeutic Technologies 2014, 2: 23206 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/jartt.v2.23206en
dc.identifier.issn2001-6824
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37326
dc.descriptionThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), permitting all non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.description.abstractArt plays a vital role in developing a child’s communication, problem solving, social and emotional skills as well as motor control, creativity and self-expression. For children with severe impairments that limit their access to traditional art processes, it is important to find alternative methods to enable these children to express themselves creatively. Advantages of a virtual art program include its ability to compensate for specific physical impairments, flexibility of incorporating sensory feedback, such as audio, to improve engagement, the avoidance of the untidiness often associated with children’s arts activities, and the absence of physical parts conducive to accidental ingestion. The Kinect Virtual Art Program (KVAP) uses the Microsoft Kinect gesture recognition technology that facilitates a new method of engaging children in therapeutic recreation. The program was designed to allow the creation of art through non-contact ‘virtual’ button activation. A pilot study was performed with five children with severe impairments to determine the level of physical engagement that these children could attain while using the KVAP over five sessions. The results indicated that the participants enjoyed using the KVAP and increasingly engaged with it over the sessions. The KVAP encouraged physical activity and enabled children to create their own works of art, an activity that was previously inaccessible to them using traditional approaches. The KVAP may offer a potential new avenue for therapy, play and exploration.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCo-Action Publishingen
dc.rights© 2014 Laura Diment and David Hobbs.en
dc.subjectvirtual arten
dc.subjectgesture recognitionen
dc.subjectMicrosoft Kinecten
dc.subjectphysical engagementen
dc.subjectsensory feedbacken
dc.titleA gesture-based virtual art program for children with severe motor impairments - development and pilot studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3402/jartt.v2.23206en
dc.rights.holderLaura Diment and David Hobbs.en
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupHobbs, David Anthony: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1164-3899en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record