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dc.contributor.authorKolt, Gregory S
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Emma S
dc.contributor.authorRebar, Amanda L
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Mitch J
dc.contributor.authorVandelanotte, Corneel
dc.contributor.authorCaperchione, Cristina M
dc.contributor.authorMaeder, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorTague, Rhys
dc.contributor.authorSavage, Trevor N
dc.contributor.authorvan Itallie, Anetta K
dc.contributor.authorMawella, Nadeesha R
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Wei-Wen
dc.contributor.authorMummery, W Kerry
dc.contributor.authorRosenkranz, Richard R
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-28T04:57:57Z
dc.date.available2017-07-28T04:57:57Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-29
dc.identifier.citationKolt GS, George ES, Rebar AL, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Caperchione CM, et al. (2017) Associations between quality of life and duration and frequency of physical activity and sedentary behaviour: Baseline findings from the WALK 2.0 randomised controlled trial. PLoS ONE 12(6): e0180072. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal. pone.0180072en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37378
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.description.abstractWhile physical and mental health benefits of regular physical activity are well known, increasing evidence suggests that limiting sedentary behaviour is also important for health. Evidence shows associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviour with health-related quality of life (HRQoL), however, these findings are based predominantly on duration measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour (e.g., minutes/week), with less attention on frequency measures (e.g., number of bouts). We examined the association of HRQoL with physical activity and sedentary behaviour, using both continuous duration (average daily minutes) and frequency (average daily bouts≥10 min) measures. Baseline data from the WALK 2.0 trial were analysed. WALK 2.0 is a randomised controlled trial investigating the effects of Web 2.0 applications on engagement, retention, and subsequent physical activity change. Daily physical activity and sedentary behaviour (duration = average minutes, frequency = average number of bouts ≥10 minutes) were measured (ActiGraph GT3X) across one week, and HRQoL was assessed with the ‘general health’ subscale of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey. Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate associations. Participants (N = 504) were 50.8±13.1 (mean±SD) years old with a BMI of 29.3±6.0. The 465 participants with valid accelerometer data engaged in an average of 24.0±18.3 minutes and 0.64±0.74 bouts of moderate-vigorous physical activity per day, 535.2±83.8 minutes and 17.0±3.4 bouts of sedentary behaviour per day, and reported moderate-high general HRQoL (64.5±20.0). After adjusting for covariates, the duration measures of physical activity (path correlation = 0.294, p<0.05) and sedentary behaviour were related to general HRQoL (path coefficient = -0.217, p<0.05). The frequency measure of physical activity was also significant (path coefficient = -0.226, p<0.05) but the frequency of sedentary behaviour was not significantly associated with general HRQoL. Higher duration levels of physical activity in fewer bouts, and lower duration of sedentary behaviour are associated with better general HRQoL. Further prospective studies are required to investigate these associations in different population groups over time.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/589903en
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1105926en
dc.rights© 2017 Kolt et al.en
dc.subjectmental healthen
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen
dc.subjecthealthrelated quality of life (HRQoL)en
dc.subjectWALK 2.0en
dc.titleAssociations between quality of life and duration and frequency of physical activity and sedentary behaviour: Baseline findings from the WALK 2.0 randomised controlled trialen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.relation.grantnumberNHMRC/589903
dc.relation.grantnumberNHMRC/1105926
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180072en
dc.rights.holderKolt et al.en
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupGeorge, Emma S: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8646-1849en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupMaeder, Anthony: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7398-2581en_US


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