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dc.contributor.authorUsher, Matthew L
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-07T02:15:38Z
dc.date.available2017-08-07T02:15:38Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationUsher, M. (2017). Felt-quality and Attitudinal Accounts of Pleasure and Pain in Ancient Greek and Contemporary Philosophy. Journal of Modern Greek Studies (Australia and New Zealand) — Special Issue, 41–55.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-646-97231-2
dc.identifier.issn1039-2831
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37389
dc.descriptionReproduced with permission of the publisher. © 2017, Modern Greek Studies Association of Australia and New Zealand. All rights reserved.en
dc.description.abstractA problem that emerges when analysing the arguments for and against hedonism is that each side has its own conception of the nature of pleasure and pain and paradigmatic examples which support their own argument. In this paper, I examine a disagreement that can be observed back in the arguments of the philosophers of classical Greek period, as to whether pleasures and/or pains are essentially feelings or more like propositional attitudes. I suggest Plato’s arguments in the Philebus are in accord with current thinking in this area, and push away from subjectivist conceptions of the good towards those that are objectivist.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherModern Greek Studies Association of Australia and New Zealanden
dc.rights© 2017, Modern Greek Studies Association of Australia and New Zealand. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectPleasure and Painen
dc.subjectPleasureen
dc.subjectPainen
dc.subjectPhilebusen
dc.titleFelt-quality and Attitudinal Accounts of Pleasure and Pain in Ancient Greek and Contemporary Philosophyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderModern Greek Studies Association of Australia and New Zealand.en


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