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dc.contributor.authorLawn, Sharon Joy
dc.contributor.authorZabeen, Sara
dc.contributor.authorSmith, David
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Ellen
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Cathie
dc.contributor.authorBattersby, Malcolm Wayne
dc.contributor.authorMasman, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-03T03:59:15Z
dc.date.available2017-10-03T03:59:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-24
dc.identifier.citationLawn S, Zabeen S, Smith D, Wilson E, Miller C, Battersby M and Masman K (2017) Managing chronic conditions care across primary care and hospital systems: lessons from an Australian Hospital Avoidance Risk Program using the Flinders Chronic Condition Management Program. Australian Health Review: -, doi https://doi.org/10.1071/AH17099.en
dc.identifier.issn0156-5788
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37507
dc.descriptionJournal compilation © AHHA 2018 Open Access CC BY-NC-NDen
dc.description.abstractObjective The study aimed to determine the impact of the Flinders Chronic Condition Management Program for chronic condition self-management care planning and how to improve its use with Bendigo Health’s Hospital Admission Risk Program (HARP). Methods A retrospective analysis of hospital admission data collected by Bendigo Health from July 2012 to September 2013 was undertaken. Length of stay during admission and total contacts post-discharge by hospital staff for 253 patients with 644 admissions were considered as outcome variables. For statistical modelling we used the generalised linear model. Results The combination of the HARP and Flinders Program was able to achieve significant reductions in hospital admissions and non-significant reduction in emergency department presentations and length of stay. The generalised linear model predicted that vulnerable patient groups such as those with heart disease (P = 0.037) and complex needs (P < 0.001) received more post-discharge contacts by HARP staff than those suffering from diabetes, renal conditions and psychosocial needs when they lived alone. Similarly, respiratory (P < 0.001), heart disease (P = 0.015) and complex needs (P = 0.050) patients had more contacts, with an increased number of episodes than those suffering from diabetes, renal conditions and psychosocial needs. Conclusion The Flinders Program appeared to have significant positive impacts on HARP patients that could be more effective if high-risk groups, such as respiratory patients with no carers and respiratory and heart disease patients aged 0–65, had received more targeted care. What is known about the topic? Chronic conditions are common causes of premature death and disability in Australia. Besides mental and physical impacts at the individual level, chronic conditions are strongly linked to high costs and health service utilisation. Hospital avoidance programs such as HARP can better manage chronic conditions through a greater focus on coordination and integration of care across primary care and hospital systems. In support of HARP, self-management interventions such as the Flinders Program aim to help individuals better manage their medical treatment and cope with the impact of the condition on their physical and mental wellbeing and thus reduce health services utilisation. What does this paper add? This paper sheds light on which patients might be more or less likely to benefit from the combination of the HARP and Flinders Program, with regard to their impact on reductions in hospital admissions, emergency department presentations and length of stay. This study also sheds light on how the Flinders Program could be better targeted towards and implemented among high-need and high-cost patients to lessen chronic disease burden on Australia’s health system. What are the implications for practitioners? Programs targeting vulnerable populations and applying evidence-based chronic condition management and self-management support achieve significant reductions in potentially avoidable hospitalisation and emergency department presentation rates, though sex, type of chronic condition and living situation appear to matter. Benefits might also accrue from the combination of contextual factors (such as the Flinders Program, supportive service management, clinical champions in the team) that work synergistically.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishingen
dc.rightsJournal compilation © AHHA 2018 Open Access CC BY-NC-NDen
dc.subjectchronic condition self-managementen
dc.subjectcare planningen
dc.subjectBendigo Health’s Hospital Admission Risk Program (HARP)en
dc.subjecthospital admissionen
dc.titleManaging chronic conditions care across primary care and hospital systems: lessons from an Australian Hospital Avoidance Risk Program using the Flinders Chronic Condition Management Programen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1071/AH17099en
dc.rights.holderAHHAen
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC-ND
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupLawn, Sharon Joy: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5464-8887en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupBattersby, Malcolm Wayne: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7306-5591en_US


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