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dc.contributor.authorPtushkina, Martina
dc.contributor.authorPoolman, Toryn
dc.contributor.authorIqbal, Mudassar
dc.contributor.authorAshe, Mark
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Janni
dc.contributor.authorWoodburn, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorRattray, Magnus
dc.contributor.authorWhetton, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorRay, David
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-16T04:18:51Z
dc.date.available2017-10-16T04:18:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-21
dc.identifier.citationPtushkina, M., Poolman, T., Iqbal, M., Ashe, M., Petersen, J., Woodburn, J., … Ray, D. (2017). A non-transcriptional role for the glucocorticoid receptor in mediating the cell stress response. Scientific Reports, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-09722-zen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37534
dc.descriptionThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.description.abstractThe glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is essential for the stress response in mammals. We investigated potential non-transcriptional roles of GR in cellular stress response using fission yeast as a model.We surprisingly discovered marked heat stress resistance in yeast ectopically expressing human GR, which required expression of both the N-terminal transactivation domain, and the C-terminal ligand binding domain, but not the DNA-binding domain of the GR. This effect was not affected by GR ligand exposure, and occurred without significant GR nuclear accumulation. Mechanistically, the GR survival effect required Hsp104, and, indeed, GR expression increased Hsp104 expression. Proteomic analysis revealed GR binding to translasome components, including eIF3, a known partner for Sty1, a pattern of protein interaction which we confirmed using yeast two-hybrid studies.Taken together, we find evidence for a novel pathway conferring stress resistance in yeast that can be activated by the human GR, acting by protein-protein mechanisms in the cytoplasm. This suggests that in organisms where GR is natively expressed, GR likely contributes to stress responses through non-transcriptional mechanisms in addition to its well-established transcriptional responses.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017en
dc.subjectProtein–protein interaction networksen
dc.subjectEvolutionen
dc.titleA non-transcriptional role for the glucocorticoid receptor in mediating the cell stress responseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-09722-zen
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)en
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupPetersen, Janni: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0729-9335en_US


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