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dc.contributor.authorZiersch, Anna Marie
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Moira
dc.contributor.authorDue, Clemence
dc.contributor.authorDuivesteyn, Emily
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-16T04:54:09Z
dc.date.available2017-10-16T04:54:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-04
dc.identifier.citationZiersch, A., Walsh, M., Due, C., & Duivesteyn, E. (2017). Exploring the Relationship between Housing and Health for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in South Australia: A Qualitative Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14(9), 1036. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091036en
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37536
dc.descriptionLicensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.description.abstractHousing is an important social determinant of health; however, little is known about the impact of housing experiences on health and wellbeing for people from refugee and asylum-seeking backgrounds. In this paper, we outline a qualitative component of a study in South Australia examining these links. Specifically, interviews were conducted with 50 refugees and asylum seekers who were purposively sampled according to gender, continent and visa status, from a broader survey. Interviews were analysed thematically. The results indicated that housing was of central importance to health and wellbeing and impacted on health through a range of pathways including affordability, the suitability of housing in relation to physical aspects such as condition and layout, and social aspects such as safety and belonging and issues around security of tenure. Asylum seekers in particular reported that living in housing in poor condition negatively affected their health. Our research reinforces the importance of housing for both the physical and mental health for asylum seekers and refugees living in resettlement countries. Improving housing quality, affordability and tenure security all have the potential to lead to more positive health outcomes. View Full-Texten
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/LP130100782en
dc.rights© 2017 by the authors.en
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.subjectwellbeingen
dc.subjecthousingen
dc.subjectasylum seeker;en
dc.subjectrefugee;en
dc.subjecthumanitarian migranten
dc.titleBarriers to Effective Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Rapidly Urbanizing Area in Thailanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.relation.grantnumberNHMRC/30100782
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091036en
dc.rights.holderthe authors.en


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