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dc.contributor.authorGrech, Megan
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Tracey
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Lindy
dc.contributor.authorChen, Celia Shin Wen
dc.contributor.authorLoetscher, Tobias
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-21T01:51:12Z
dc.date.available2017-11-21T01:51:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-31
dc.identifier.citationGrech M, Stuart T, Williams L, Chen C and Loetscher T (2017) The Mobility Assessment Course for the Diagnosis of Spatial Neglect: Taking a Step Forward? Front. Neurol. 8:563. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2017.00563en_US
dc.identifier.issn1662-5129
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37694
dc.descriptionThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.description.abstractSpatial neglect after stroke can be a challenging syndrome to diagnose under standard neuropsychological assessment. There is now sufficient evidence that those affected might demonstrate neglect behavior in everyday settings despite showing no signs of neglect during common neglect tasks. This discrepancy is attributed to the simplified and unrealistic nature of common pen and paper based tasks that do not match the demanding, novel, and complex environment of everyday life. As such, increasing task demands under more ecologically valid scenarios has become an important method of increasing test sensitivity. The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the Mobility Assessment Course (MAC), an ecological task, for the assessment of neglect. If neglect becomes more apparent under more challenging task demands the MAC could prove to be more diagnostically accurate at detecting neglect than conventional methods, particularly as the time from initial brain damage increases. Data collected by Guide Dogs of SA/NT were retrospectively analyzed. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, was used to investigate the diagnostic utility of the MAC and a series of paper and pencil tests in 67 right hemisphere stroke survivors. While the MAC proved to be a more sensitive neglect test (74.2%) when compared to the Star Cancellation (43.3%) and Line Bisection (35.7%) tests, this was at the expense of relatively low specificity. As a result, the ROC curve analysis showed no statistically discernable differences between tasks (p > 0.12), or between subacute and chronic groups for individual tasks (p > 0.45). It is concluded that, while the MAC is an ecologically valid alternative for assessing neglect, regarding its diagnostic accuracy, there is currently not enough evidence to suggest that it is a big step forward in comparison to the accuracy of conventional tests.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2017 Grech, Stuart, Williams, Chen and Loetscheren_US
dc.subjectassessment of neglecten_US
dc.subjectmobility,en_US
dc.subjectvision,en_US
dc.subjectclinical utilityen_US
dc.subjectecological validityen_US
dc.subjectsensitivity,en_US
dc.subjectspecificityen_US
dc.titleThe Mobility Assessment Course for the Diagnosis of Spatial Neglect: Taking a Step Forward?en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2017.00563en
dc.rights.holderGrech, Stuart, Williams, Chen and Loetscheren_US
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY


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