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dc.contributor.authorVandelanotte, Corneel
dc.contributor.authorKolt, Gregory S
dc.contributor.authorCaperchione, Cristina M
dc.contributor.authorSavage, Trevor N
dc.contributor.authorRosenkranz, Richard R
dc.contributor.authorMaeder, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorvan Itallie, Anetta K
dc.contributor.authorTague, Rhys
dc.contributor.authorOldmeadow, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorMummery, W Kerry
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Mitch J
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-27T01:03:25Z
dc.date.available2018-03-27T01:03:25Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-17
dc.identifier.citationVandelanotte C, Kolt GS, Caperchione CM, Savage TN, Rosenkranz RR, Maeder AJ, Van Itallie A, Tague R, Oldmeadow C, Mummery WK, Duncan MJ Effectiveness of a Web 2.0 Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Real-World Settings: Randomized Ecological Trial J Med Internet Res 2017;19(11):e390 DOI: 10.2196/jmir.8484 PMID: 29133282 PMCID: 5703981en_US
dc.identifier.issn1438-8871
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37822
dc.descriptionThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: The translation of Web-based physical activity intervention research into the real world is lacking and becoming increasingly important. Objective: To compare usage and effectiveness, in real-world settings, of a traditional Web 1.0 Web-based physical activity intervention, providing limited interactivity, to a Web 2.0 Web-based physical activity intervention that includes interactive features, such as social networking (ie, status updates, online “friends,” and personalized profile pages), blogs, and Google Maps mash-ups. Methods: Adults spontaneously signing up for the freely available 10,000 Steps website were randomized to the 10,000 Steps website (Web 1.0) or the newly developed WALK 2.0 website (Web 2.0). Physical activity (Active Australia Survey), quality of life (RAND 36), and body mass index (BMI) were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months. Website usage was measured continuously. Analyses of covariance were used to assess change over time in continuous outcome measures. Multiple imputation was used to deal with missing data. Results: A total of 1328 participants completed baseline assessments. Only 3-month outcomes (224 completers) were analyzed due to high attrition at 12 months (77 completers). Web 2.0 group participants increased physical activity by 92.8 minutes per week more than those in the Web 1.0 group (95% CI 28.8-156.8; P=.005); their BMI values also decreased more (–1.03 kg/m2, 95% CI –1.65 to -0.41; P=.001). For quality of life, only the physical functioning domain score significantly improved more in the Web 2.0 group (3.6, 95% CI 1.7-5.5; P<.001). The time between the first and last visit to the website (3.57 vs 2.22 weeks; P<.001) and the mean number of days the website was visited (9.02 vs 5.71 days; P=.002) were significantly greater in the Web 2.0 group compared to the Web 1.0 group. The difference in time-to-nonusage attrition was not statistically significant between groups (Hazard Ratio=0.97, 95% CI 0.86-1.09; P=.59). Only 21.99% (292/1328) of participants (n=292 summed for both groups) were still using either website after 2 weeks and 6.55% (87/1328) were using either website after 10 weeks. Conclusions: The website that provided more interactive and social features was more effective in improving physical activity in real-world conditions. While the Web 2.0 website was visited significantly more, both groups nevertheless displayed high nonusage attrition and low intervention engagement. More research is needed to examine the external validity and generalizability of Web-based physical activity interventions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJMIR Publicationsen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Corneel Vandelanotte, Gregory S Kolt, Cristina M Caperchione, Trevor N Savage, Richard R Rosenkranz, Anthony J Maeder, Anetta Van Itallie, Rhys Tague, Christopher Oldmeadow, W Kerry Mummery, Mitch J Duncan.en_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.subjectonline;en_US
dc.subjectWeb based;en_US
dc.subjectbehavioral intervention;en_US
dc.subjectexternal validity;en_US
dc.subjectpragmatic trialen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of a Web 2.0 Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Real-World Settings: Randomized Ecological Trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.8484en
dc.rights.holderCorneel Vandelanotte, Gregory S Kolt, Cristina M Caperchione, Trevor N Savage, Richard R Rosenkranz, Anthony J Maeder, Anetta Van Itallie, Rhys Tague, Christopher Oldmeadow, W Kerry Mummery, Mitch J Duncan.en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupMaeder, Anthony: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7398-2581en_US


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