Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCisternas, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorScheerens, C
dc.contributor.authorOmari, Taher
dc.contributor.authorMonrroy, H
dc.contributor.authorHani, A
dc.contributor.authorLeguizamo, A
dc.contributor.authorBilder, C
dc.contributor.authorDitaranto, A
dc.contributor.authorRuiz de Leon, A
dc.contributor.authorPerez de la Serna, J
dc.contributor.authorValdovinos, M A
dc.contributor.authorCoello, R
dc.contributor.authorAbrahao, L
dc.contributor.authorRemes-Troche, J
dc.contributor.authorMeixueiro, A
dc.contributor.authorZavala, M A
dc.contributor.authorMarin, I
dc.contributor.authorSerra, J
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-03T23:22:24Z
dc.date.available2018-04-03T23:22:24Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-07
dc.identifier.citationCisternas, D., Scheerens, C., Omari, T., Monrroy, H., Hani, A., Leguizamo, A., … Serra, J. (2017). Anxiety can significantly explain bolus perception in the context of hypotensive esophageal motility: Results of a large multicenter study in asymptomatic individuals. Neurogastroenterology & Motility, 29(9), e13088. https://doi.org/10.1111/nmo.13088en
dc.identifier.issn1365-2982
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/37840
dc.descriptionThis article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving'. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. This author accepted manuscript is made available following 12 month embargo from date of publication (May 2017) in accordance with the publisher’s archiving policyen
dc.description.abstractBackground Previous studies have not been able to correlate manometry findings with bolus perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate correlation of different variables, including traditional manometric variables (at diagnostic and extreme thresholds), esophageal shortening, bolus transit, automated impedance manometry (AIM) metrics and mood with bolus passage perception in a large cohort of asymptomatic individuals. Methods High resolution manometry (HRM) was performed in healthy individuals from nine centers. Perception was evaluated using a 5‐point Likert scale. Anxiety was evaluated using Hospitalized Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD). Subgroup analysis was also performed classifying studies into normal, hypotensive, vigorous, and obstructive patterns. Key Results One hundred fifteen studies were analyzed (69 using HRM and 46 using high resolution impedance manometry (HRIM); 3.5% swallows in 9.6% of volunteers were perceived. There was no correlation of any of the traditional HRM variables, esophageal shortening, AIM metrics nor bolus transit with perception scores. There was no HRM variable showing difference in perception when comparing normal vs extreme values (percentile 1 or 99). Anxiety but not depression was correlated with perception. Among hypotensive pattern, anxiety was a strong predictor of variance in perception (R2 up to .70). Conclusion and Inferences Bolus perception is less common than abnormal motility among healthy individuals. Neither esophageal motor function nor bolus dynamics evaluated with several techniques seems to explain differences in bolus perception. Different mechanisms seem to be relevant in different manometric patterns. Anxiety is a significant predictor of bolus perception in the context of hypotensive motility.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.rights© 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en
dc.subjectbolus perceptionen
dc.subjectesophageal shortening,en
dc.subjectManometryen
dc.subjectbolus transiten
dc.subjectautomated impedance manometry (AIM)en
dc.subjectHigh resolution manometry (HRM)en
dc.titleAnxiety can significantly explain bolus perception in the context of hypotensive esophageal motility: Results of a large multicenter study in asymptomatic individualsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/nmo.13088en
dc.rights.holderJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.en
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupOmari, Taher: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5108-7378en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record