Now showing items 1-20 of 1033

    • Engels spelenderwijs 

      Daalder, Joost; Verhulst, George (Meulenhoff, Amsterdam, 1964)
      Please note: this book is in Dutch.
    • Rhetoric and revision in Wyatt's poems 

      Daalder, Joost (Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, 1969-05)
      In this paper the author considers, from a critical point of view, revisions made by Wyatt himself in his own poems.
    • Review of 'Shakespeare's metrics' by Dorothy L. Sipe 

      Daalder, Joost (Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, 1970-11)
      Miss Sipe sets out to prove correct the debated assumption that Shakespeare "wrote carefully constructed iambic verse into which he introduced only those few minor variations considered permissible in his time". Her labour ...
    • Some Problems of Punctuation and Syntax in Egerton MS 2711 of Wyatt's Verse 

      Daalder, Joost (Oxford University Press, 1971)
      In this brief article, Professor Daalder discusses a number of instances where the punctuation of Muir and Thomson's 'Collected Poems of Sir Thomas Wyatt', which the modern reader is meant to find comprehensible and helpful, ...
    • Review of 'Collected poems of Sir Thomas Wyatt' edited by Muir and Thomson 

      Daalder, Joost (Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, 1971-05)
      Daalder reviews 'Collected poems of Sir Thomas Wyatt', edited by Kenneth Muir and Patricia Thomson (Liverpool University Press, 1969).
    • Review of 'A linguistic guide to English poetry' by Geoffrey N Leech 

      Daalder, Joost (Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, 1971-05)
      The author reviews 'A linguistic guide to English poetry'. (London and Harrow: Longmans, English Language Series, 1969.)
    • Review of 'Triumphal forms: structural patterns in Elizabethan poetry' by Alastair Fowler 

      Daalder, Joost (Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, 1971-05)
      Daalder reviews "Triumphal forms: structural patterns in Elizabethan poetry' by Alastair Fowler (Cambridge University Press, 1970).
    • Wyatt's 'There was never nothing more me payned': a reply to John Douglas Boyd 

      Daalder, Joost (Oxford University Press, 1971-10)
      As far as Wyatt's poem is concerned, I think Boyd's critical problems are largely of his own making. This does not necessarily invalidate his claim that a critic, in interpreting a literary work, may seize on one interpretation ...
    • W.H. Auden's "Another Time" 

      Daalder, Joost (Western Washington State College, 1972)
      The title-poem of Auden's volume 'Another Time' has received little critical attention. Here the author discusses Auden's understanding of time, and our place in it.
    • The Sense of Some Passages in Wyatt 

      Daalder, Joost (Parergon, 1972)
      The author discusses the sense of Wyatt's verse, particularly in its syntax, and how it sometimes offers difficulties which editors have not—or not sufficiently—elucidated.
    • "Disputed Ground" in the Poetry of Charles Brasch 

      Daalder, Joost (University of Otago Press, 1972)
      A response to Vincent O'Sullivan's article, "'Brief Permitted Morning' - Notes on the Poetry of Charles Brasch" in which Professor Daalder discusses issues of spirtuality, temporality and mortality in the 'Disputed Ground' ...
    • Wyatt and Tottel: a textual comparison 

      Daalder, Joost (University of Adelaide Department of English, 1972)
      Tottel's editorial revisions of Wyatt's poems, as they appear in his Tottel's Miscellany, are explored from a critical point of view.
    • Review of 'Chaucer's prosody' by Ian Robinson 

      Daalder, Joost (Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, 1972-05)
      Despite some interesting suggestions and bits of information, Ian Robinson overlooks too much altogether. I say this, not to damn his book, but to express dissatisfaction with it. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1971.)
    • Wyatt and "Liberty" 

      Daalder, Joost (Oxford University Press, 1973)
      In this article, Professor Daalder discusses how the word 'liberty' represents more than merely a state in which the lover is not a 'thrall' who is 'bound' to a woman he 'serves' according to a conventional code of courtly ...
    • Editing Wyatt 

      Daalder, Joost (Oxford University Press, 1973)
      This article provides an examination of the 'Collected Poems of Sir Thomas Wyatt', edited by Kenneth Muir and Patricia Thomson, together with suggestions for an improved edition.
    • Yeats and Auden: Some Verbal Parallels 

      Daalder, Joost (Oxford University Press, 1973)
      As has been previously observed, Auden verbally resembles Yeats on more than one occasion, and Yeats sometimes resembles Auden. But, as far as Daalder is aware, several genuine or possible parallels are yet to be discussed. ...
    • W.H. Auden's 'The Shield of Achilles' and its sources 

      Daalder, Joost (Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, 1974-11)
      W.H. Auden's 'The Shield of Achilles', the title poem of the volume published by Faber and Faber in 1955, is coming to be regarded, and rightly so, as one of his finest and most significant creations after World War II. ...
    • Sir Thomas Wyatt: Collected poems 

      Daalder, Joost (Editor) (Oxford University Press, 1975)
      An edition offering correct and annotated transcripts of the primary sources containing Wyatt's and other early Tudor verse is badly needed; meanwhile it is hoped that the present volume will provide the general reader ...
    • Modern Poetry in Translation 

      Daalder, Joost (Outrigger Publishers Ltd, 1976)
      In this article, Daalder discusses the issue of reading Continental European literary works in translation. Daalder explains that when he reads these works in English, he reads them like an Englishman - the more so because ...
    • Requiescat in Pace [short story] 

      Daalder, Joost (Outrigger Publishers Ltd, 1976)
      Published in 1976, 'Requiescat in Pace' is Professor Daalder's only work of fiction. This short story, set in New Zealand, paints a somber portrait of the final, mundane, days of the elderly protagonist's life in Dunedin.