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dc.contributor.authorCastillo, Cristina Cobo
dc.contributor.authorPolkinghorne, Martin
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Brice
dc.contributor.authorSuy, Tan Boun
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Dorian Q
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-28T00:01:55Z
dc.date.available2018-09-28T00:01:55Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-02
dc.identifier.citationCastillo, C.C., Polkinghorne, M., Vincent, B., Suy, T.B. & Fuller, D.Q., (2018). Life goes on: Archaeobotanical investigations of diet and ritual at Angkor Thom, Cambodia (14th–15th centuries CE). The Holocene, 28(6): 930-944.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1477-0911
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38342
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis is the first time an archaeobotanical analysis based on macroremains, both charred and desiccated, from Cambodia is reported. The archaeobotanical samples are rich and provide evidence of rice processing, consumption of non-indigenous pulses, and the use of economic crops. The evidence is supported by data from inscriptions, texts and historical ethnography. This study demonstrates that the city of Angkor in the 14th and 15th centuries CE, despite its decline, was still occupied. Angkor’s inhabitants continued their everyday lives cultivating and consuming their staple food, rice, with a suite of pulses, and also used the harvests in the performance of rituals.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project Grant (DP110101968) and the National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program (#W122-10). The archaeobotanical research was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Grant # NE/N010957/1. Funding for the 14C accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis was provided by the École française d’Extrême-Orient. Project collaborators included The University of Sydney; University College London (UCL), Institute of Archaeology; the APSARA National Authority; the École française d’Extrême-Orient; the National Museum of Cambodia; the Freer and Sackler Galleries; Smithsonian Institution; the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France; and the Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018. Made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectAngkoren_US
dc.subjectarchaeobotanyen_US
dc.subjectCambodia pulsesen_US
dc.subjectcottonen_US
dc.subjectriceen_US
dc.subjectsesameen_US
dc.subjectSoutheast Asiaen_US
dc.titleLife goes on: Archaeobotanical investigations of diet and ritual at Angkor Thom, Cambodia (14th–15th centuries CE)en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.relation.grantnumberARC/DP110101968en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0959683617752841en_US
dc.rights.holder© The Author(s) 2018.en_US


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