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dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Alan
dc.contributor.authorOster, Candice
dc.contributor.authorMuir-Cochrane, Eimear Caitlin
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-04T03:25:55Z
dc.date.available2018-10-04T03:25:55Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-31
dc.identifier.citationSimpson, A., Oster, C. & Muir-Cochrane, E.C., (2017). Liminality in the occupational identity of mental health peer support workers: A qualitative study. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27: 662-671.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1447-0349
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38356
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.en_US
dc.description.abstractPeer support is increasingly provided as a component of mental health care, where people in recovery from mental health problems use their lived experiences to provide support to those experiencing similar difficulties. In the present study, we explored the evolution of peer support workers’ (PSW) occupational identities. A qualitative study was undertaken alongside a pilot randomized, controlled trial of peer support for service users discharged from a mental hospital in London, UK. Two focus groups were conducted with eight PSW. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 13 service users receiving peer support and on two occasions with a peer support coordinator. The data were analysed using theoretical thematic analysis, focussing on occupational identity formation. We discuss how the occupational identity of PSW evolved through the interplay between their lived experience, their training, and their engagement in the practice environment in such a way as to construct a liminal identity, with positive and negative outcomes. While the difficulties associated with the liminality of PSW could be eased through the formalization and professionalization of the PSW role, there are concerns that this could lead to an undermining of the value of PSW in providing a service by peers for peers that is separate from formal mental health care and relationships. Skilled support is essential in helping PSW negotiate the potential stressors and difficulties of a liminal PSW identity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe project was commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research for Patient Benefit programme (RfPB PB-PG-0408-16151).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rights© 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.en_US
dc.subjectliminalityen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectoccupational identityen_US
dc.subjectpeer supporten_US
dc.subjectpeer support workeren_US
dc.titleLiminality in the occupational identity of mental health peer support workers: A qualitative studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12351en_US
dc.rights.holder© 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupMuir-Cochrane, Eimear Caitlin: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5036-4908en_US


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