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dc.contributor.authorNorton, Lynda
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorBevan, Nadia
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-05T00:19:40Z
dc.date.available2018-10-05T00:19:40Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-26
dc.identifier.citationNorton, L., Thomas, J., Bevan, N., Norton, K., (2018). Agreement between pre-exercise screening questionnaires completed online versus face-to-face. PLoS ONE, 13(6): e0199836.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38370
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives To investigate the levels of agreement between self-reported responses to the Adult Preexercise Screening System (APSS) questionnaire using online versus face-to-face (F2F) modalities. Design Convenience sample of adults completing a pre-exercise screening questionnaire using different modalities. Methods Adult volunteers (n = 94) were recruited to complete the APSS using both online and F2F modalities. Participants were provided a URL link to an online APSS questionnaire then followed- up the next day in a F2F interview. Objective health risk factors were also measured. Comparisons between responses were undertaken using kappa and correlation statistics to determine levels of agreement. Results The levels of agreement between online versus F2F responses for the seven compulsory Stage 1 questions (known diseases and signs and/or symptoms of disease) were >94% (kappa = 0.644±0.794). Response comparisons for Stage 2 questions on health risk factors were also generally high (>82% agreement) but there were larger differences between reported and measured risk factors in Stage 3. Conclusions Levels of agreement between the Stage 1 responses were substantial and support the use of this online option for pre-exercise screening. There were larger differences between selfreported and objectively measured health risk factors in Stages 2 and 3.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors received no specific funding for this work.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.rights© 2018 Norton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.titleAgreement between pre-exercise screening questionnaires completed online versus face-to-faceen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0199836en_US
dc.rights.holder© 2018 Norton et al.en_US
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupNorton, Lynda: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4092-9303en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupThomas, Jessica: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6245-6060


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