Adam Graycar was a lecturer Social Policy at Flinders until his departure in 1980 to become the Foundation Director of the Social Policy Research Centre at the University of New South Wales. In the intervening decades he has held a wide range of academic and government posts. In 2015 he returned as strategic professor in public policy.

He acquired extensive policy experience over 22 years in the senior level posts he has held in government, both Federal and State. His most recent government position was Head, Cabinet Office, Government of South Australia (2003-2007). He also had nine years (1994-2003) as head of a Commonwealth Statutory Authority, the Australian Institute of Criminology a government agency whose task is to provide quality information and conduct policy oriented research. He was also the nation’s first Commissioner for the Ageing (1985-1990).

Before returning to Flinders his most recent academic posts were Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University, and before that, Dean and Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

He has worked in many public policy domains and his current work is on integrity and corruption prevention in Australia and internationally. He is working closely with international agencies such as the United Nations (UNODC) and the World Bank, as well as teaching specialist courses in leading universities in Asia, Europe and North America.

Recent Submissions

  • Accommodation for elderly people 

    Graycar, Adam (1989-04)
    From the viewpoint of elderly people themselves, the question of accommodation is a crucial one. Their housing takes on an increasing importance, not only in a financial sense but also psychologically. Moreover, most ...
  • South Australian College of Advanced Education graduation address 

    Graycar, Adam (1989-06)
    The most common set of stereotypes was that older people were almost universally debilitated and depressed, daggy and despicable, daft and dejected, demented and dotty. It was commonly assumed that before long our society ...
  • Royal Adelaide Hospital School of Nursing graduation address 

    Graycar, Adam (1989-10)
    The most common set of stereotypes was that older people were almost universally debilitated and depressed, daggy and despicable, daft and dejected, demented and dotty. It was commonly assumed that before long our society ...
  • Legal rights of elderly people 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-10)
    Every aspect of the lives of elderly people is affected by change and its social ramifications, from increased consumer activity, through electronic banking, through to travel and entertainment, through to changing family ...
  • Welfare and the State: issues for the 1990s 

    Graycar, Adam (1989-03)
    As we look to the last decade of this century, after almost a century of formal welfare state activity, we can't get away from the one fundamental part of our analysis, and that is how people live and how they ought to ...
  • Current developments in aged care in Australia 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-10)
    In June 1987 there were in Western Australia 130,365 people in their fifties, 104,562 in their sixties, 66,362 in their seventies and 26,816 aged eighty or over. Almost one in four Western Australians is aged 50 or over. ...
  • State Government iniatives in protecting the legal rights of older people 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-09)
    Demographic change has meant that we are witnessing higher proportions of elderly people in all societies, greater life expectancy at birth and at all advanced ages, substantial drops in age specific mortality rates at ...
  • Public policy 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-10)
    Why does the policy process result in one type of policy rather than another? Depending on the circumstances, the answer may lie in the realm of ideology, or in the realm of pure expediency, or somewhere in between, where ...
  • Grandparents 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-09)
    We tend to associate grandparents with old-fashioned families - the extended, multigenerational kind much celebrated in our mythology. Many think that grandparents have become less important as the nation has become more ...
  • Nursing homes and hostels review 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-10)
    There are numerous operators in the nursing home industry. The largest cost input comes from the Commonwealth Government and Commonwealth decisions are of significant interest to the State Governments, to Local Governments, ...
  • Will you still need me, will you still feed me, when I'm 64? 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-06)
    Most people who are 64 are not sick, are not disabled, are not desperately poor, are reasonably well housed and like the locations they live in. There are however significant numbers that do have difficulties in many ...
  • Home and Community Care program 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-08)
    Our population is ageing. In planning for this ageing population there are many key inel.icators which require analysis. One such indicator is survivorship. Understanding the indicators helps us formulate and comprehend ...
  • The challenge of ageing 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-06)
    In 1987 our 'aged' population increased by around 55,000, or by 152 per day. The consequence of this is that whereas at the beginning of this century of all the people aged 65 and over one quarter were aged 75 and over; ...
  • Retirement villages 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-08)
    For some older people moving is an important and necessary activity and it makes life easier and more comfortable, provides a less stressful lifestyle and gives people a new lease of life. For others it is deeply distressing, ...
  • Working in the aged care industry 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-06)
    As we look to the future we will see more older people, and we will see more of our older people living longer. Those working in ageing must ensure we are responsive to the needs of those around us and treat them in a ...
  • Managing the future 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-03)
    Volunteering is an essential and necessary component of life in a modern industrial society. Both governments and volunteer networks need each other. Both work in harmony, both deliver different things, both have a ...
  • Demography - is it just a numbers game? 

    Graycar, Adam (1987-11)
    The vast majority of major policy or planning issues facing contemporary Australia have a demographic dimension. A thorough knowledge of this population dimension would not only assist in understanding wider societal ...
  • Aged care: winners and losers 

    Graycar, Adam (1988-04)
    In 1987 our 'aged' population increased by around 55,000, or by 152 per day. Public resources which are allocated are substantial, yet the range of incomes, access to services and housing situation of elderly people is ...
  • Points on discrimination 

    Graycar, Adam (1987-10)
    Age discrimination is making a choice which disadvantages, unfairly or unreasonably, an elderly person because of their age. The Equal Opportunity Act 1984 makes it unlawful to make a choice between two people on the ...
  • Basis for genuine consultation in aged care services 

    Graycar, Adam (1987-11)
    We have and will continue to have two older populations each defined as old. One population, (comprising people roughly aged over sixty-five and under seventy-five) is deemed too old for the paid labour force, and the ...

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