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dc.contributor.authorIyer, Reena
dc.contributor.authorSmith, David
dc.contributor.authorLawn, Sharon Joy
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-19T01:46:20Z
dc.date.available2018-10-19T01:46:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-02
dc.identifier.citationIyer, R., Smith, D., and Lawn, S. J., (2017). An audit of the management of nicotine withdrawal in an Australian inpatient unit: are we there yet? Australasian Psychiatry, 26(1): 13-19.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1440-1665
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38435
dc.descriptionThis manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/av which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This paper reports outcomes of a clinical audit of smoke-free policy implementation within an Australian inpatient psychiatric setting. It aimed to evaluate assessment of smoking status and subsequent management of nicotine withdrawal, and investigate any patient factors influencing these processes. Methods: A total of 67 medical case notes were retrospectively analysed for inpatients admitted to psychiatric units of a general hospital in South Australia, from July to September 2015. Patient demographic variables and information from the hospital’s Smoking Assessment and Management Form (SAMF) were recorded. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics and Chi-square tests of association between dependent variables (how the SAMF was completed) and independent variables (sex, voluntary status, diagnosis). Results: The SAMF was implemented for most patients (76.1%), with 64.71% completed within 24 hours of admission; though, many were incomplete. Nicotine dependence was not properly assessed for 42.3% of smokers; 69.23% were prescribed nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), despite most scoring moderate to high nicotine dependence. No statistically significant relationships were found between patient factors and form completion. Conclusions: SAMF completion was timely for most patients; however, sections important for determining support actions remained largely incomplete, suggesting patients’ nicotine withdrawal is not being adequately addressed. More work is needed to improve inpatient staff’s assessment to ensure optimal care.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.rights© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectinpatientsen_US
dc.subjectclinical proceduresen_US
dc.subjectnicotine replacement therapyen_US
dc.subjectsmoking cessationen_US
dc.subjectmental illnessen_US
dc.titleAn audit of the management of nicotine withdrawal in an Australian inpatient unit: are we there yet?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1039856217732481en_US
dc.rights.holder© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2017.en_US
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC-ND
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupLawn, Sharon Joy: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5464-8887en_US


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