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dc.contributor.authorGraycar, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-27T04:54:37Z
dc.date.available2018-11-27T04:54:37Z
dc.date.issued2000-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38611
dc.descriptionPaper presented at workshop 7 at the conference "Youth justice 2000 - managing a new world in transit", Singapore, 13-15 September 2000, by Adam Graycar, Director, Australian Institute of Criminology. This speech is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile recognising that crime is wrong, restorative justice recognises that retribution can lead to the further alienation of the offender from society and therefore increase the likelihood of continued anti-social behaviour. Restorative justice focuses on the recognition of opportunities provided through this process to create a safer, more respectful and cooperative relationship between the participants and society. Restorative justice seeks to 'make things as right as possible' for all parties involved.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Australian Government
dc.subjectCrime preventionen_US
dc.subjectOffendersen_US
dc.subjectJuvenile crimeen_US
dc.subjectRestorative justiceen_US
dc.subjectYouth justiceen_US
dc.titleRepairing the harm of youth crimeen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.rights.holderAustralian Government
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupGraycar, Adam: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2649-2229en_US


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