Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGraycar, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-27T04:54:37Z
dc.date.available2018-11-27T04:54:37Z
dc.date.issued2000-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38612
dc.descriptionPaper presented at the conference 'Understanding and responding to crime and older people', Centre of Ageing & Centre for Criminology, The University of Hong Kong, 11th November 1999, by Adam Graycar, Director, Australian Institute of Criminology. This speech is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.description.abstractSince the 1970s there has been an increase in concern about older people as victims of crime. Older people, in a similar manner as other groups in the population, are at risk from four main sources: family members, friends and acquaintances, who may assault or steal from them; strangers who may victimise them; commercial organisations or "white collar" criminals who could defraud them; and carers with whom they are in a "duty of care" relationship and who may neglect or abuse them. Abuse here refers to physical, psychological, sexual and financial.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Australian Government
dc.subjectCrime preventionen_US
dc.subjectElderlyen_US
dc.subjectElder abuseen_US
dc.subjectVictims of crimeen_US
dc.subjectFear of crimeen_US
dc.titleCrime and elder issues, problems and practical responsesen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.rights.holderAustralian Government
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupGraycar, Adam: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2649-2229en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record