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dc.contributor.authorGallagher, H Colin
dc.contributor.authorBlock, Karen
dc.contributor.authorGibbs, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorForbes, David
dc.contributor.authorLusher, Dean
dc.contributor.authorMolyneaux, Robyn
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, John
dc.contributor.authorPattison, Philippa
dc.contributor.authorMacDougall, Colin James
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T02:02:14Z
dc.date.available2018-11-30T02:02:14Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-07
dc.identifier.citationGallagher, H. C., Block, K., Gibbs, L., Forbes, D., Lusher, D., Molyneaux, R., … Bryant, R. A. (2019). The effect of group involvement on post-disaster mental health: A longitudinal multilevel analysis. Social Science & Medicine, 220, 167–175.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38629
dc.descriptionThis manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This author accepted manuscript is made available following 36 month embargo from date of publication (November 2018) in accordance with the publisher’s archiving policyen_US
dc.description.abstractInvolvement in voluntary associations is a key form of social capital and plays an especially important role following disaster as a venue for coordination and decision-making for the wider community. Yet, relatively little attention has been paid to how group involvement affects mental health, at either the individual or community level. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of involvement in voluntary associations on mental health among residents of bushfire-affected communities. A longitudinal sample of 642 individuals affected by the 2009 Victorian bushfires in south-eastern Australia were surveyed in 2012 and 2014 (3- and 5-years post-disaster). A further subsample (n = 552) of residents residing continuously within 22 bushfire-affected communities were examined for community-level effects using multilevel regression methods. After adjusting for demographics, disaster exposure, and network variables, group involvement at time 1 bore a curvilinear relationship with PTSD at both time points: moderate involvement was most beneficial, with no participation, or high amounts, yielding poorer outcomes. High amounts of group involvement was likewise linked to a greater risk of major depression. Furthermore, communities with higher median levels of group involvement reported lower levels of PTSD symptoms and major depression two years later. With respect to group involvement, more is not always better. For individuals, moderation – if possible – is key. Meanwhile, community-level health benefits come when most people participate to some extent, suggesting that the distribution of involvement across the community is important.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported through an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant (LP100200164), along with the contributions of these partner organisations: Outer East Health and Community Support Alliance, Bendigo Loddon Primary Care Partnership, Lower Hume Primary Care Partnership, Central West Gippsland Primary Care Partnership, Banyule Nillumbik Primary Care Alliance, Central Hume Primary Care Partnership, Australian Red Cross, Australian Rotary Health, Victorian Department of Health, Centrelink.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rights© 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectSocial networksen_US
dc.subjectSocial capitalen_US
dc.subjectNatural disastersen_US
dc.subjectPTSDen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectVoluntary associationsen_US
dc.subjectGroup membershipen_US
dc.titleThe effect of group involvement on post-disaster mental health: A longitudinal multilevel analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.grantnumberARC/LP100200164en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.11.006en_US
dc.rights.holder© 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC-ND
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupMacDougall, Colin James: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1270-6823en_US


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