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dc.contributor.authorSharma,Daneshwar
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-18T06:21:28Z
dc.date.available2018-12-18T06:21:28Z
dc.identifier.issn1836-4845
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38758
dc.description.abstractThe spread of English is like the spread of plague of insomnia in Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, at first it is convenient, it (English and insomanis) frees one to work more, spreading the reach but soon one realizes that they are losing memories of their dear past and they are unable to have dreams of their future. Living in present with no ties to the past and no hopes of future, one becomes an alien, speaking an alien language. To counter the erosion of memories, one has to write, label things and describe their function in black and white. Marquez’s character does so, and so does Subramani in his upcoming book, Fiji Maa: Mother of a Thousand. He recreates the world of Girmitiyaas and their descendants. A world lost long, long ago is made alive in front of eyes with the power of his magical words. Reading this book will be like starting a journey back towards the grandparents’ village. This book, yet to be published, encapsulates the history of a time which will never come back. The descendants of Girmitiyaas have migrated to far off places, have lost all ties with their collective memory. Fiji Maa: Mother of a Thousand will remind them what they were before the plague of the foreign tongue. The book should be supported, celebrated and gifted to the coming generations by the present generation. The paper highlights the literary resurrection of a bygone culture in Subramani’s novel which makes it a book of thousand readings, ritualistic reading for the people of today and for the people to come. Fiji Maa: Mother of a Thousand is about digging up the long lost Girmit memory. The spread of English is like the spread of plague of insomnia in Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, at first it is convenient, it (English and insomania) frees one to work more, spreading the reach, but soon one realises that one is losing memories of their dear past and they are unable to have dreams of their future. Living in the present with no ties to the past and no hopes of the future, one becomes an alien, speaking an alien language. To counter the erosion of memories, one has to write, label things and describe their function in black and white. Marquez’s character does so, and so does Subramani in his upcoming book, Fiji Maa: Mother of a Thousand. He recreates the world of Girmitiyaas and their descendants. A world lost long, long ago is made alive in front of eyes with the power of his magical words. Reading this book will be like starting a journey back towards the grandparents’ village. This book, yet to be published, encapsulates the history of a time which will never come back. The descendants of Girmitiyaas have migrated to far off places, have lost all ties with their collective memory. Fiji Maa: Mother of a Thousand will remind them what they were before the plague of the foreign tongue. The book should be supported, celebrated and gifted to the coming generations by the present generation. The paper highlights the literary resurrection of a bygone culture in Subramani’s novel which makes it a book of thousand readings, ritualistic reading for the people of today and for the people to come. Fiji Maa: Mother of a Thousand is about digging up the long lost Girmit memory.en_US
dc.language.isoen sa fjen_US
dc.subjectCollective Memoryen_US
dc.subjectFiji Hindien_US
dc.subjectGirmit, Diasporaen_US
dc.subjectLanguage Archiveen_US
dc.subjectSubramanien_US
dc.titleFiji MAA: A Book of Thousand Readingsen_US


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