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dc.contributor.authorGraycar, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-04T01:10:18Z
dc.date.available2019-02-04T01:10:18Z
dc.date.issued1982-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38887
dc.descriptionSpeech presented to the Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG), Newcastle, 13 February 1982 by Adam Graycar, Director, Social Welfare Research Centre, University of New South Wales. Made available under the Creative Commons BY 4.0 (CC BY) Attribution license. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.description.abstractAgeing in Australia (and in other industrial societies) is seen by many as a problem because it is so often associated with dependency. Dependency, I would argue, is socially structured and created, and the social consequence of ageing is cumulative exclusion of a significant number of people from income, jobs, and meaningful roles in society. The dependencies associated with ageing are chronic rather than transitional - furthermore they are not legitimized as are the dependencies of the young, who are seen as the producers and consumers of tomorrow. Dependency is a difficult concept to see clearly and unambiguously. It means different things to different people - it has a specific meaning in demography - a very different meaning in the bio-medical world and again a different meaning in terms of social constructs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Government of South Australia
dc.subjectAgeingen_US
dc.subjectSocial policyen_US
dc.subjectElderly peopleen_US
dc.subjectAgeing populationen_US
dc.subjectDependencyen_US
dc.subjectCare of the elderlyen_US
dc.titleSocial aspects of dependence and family careen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.rights.holderGovernment of South Australia
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupGraycar, Adam: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2649-2229


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