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dc.contributor.authorGraycar, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-04T01:10:18Z
dc.date.available2019-02-04T01:10:18Z
dc.date.issued1982-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38889
dc.descriptionNotes for a speech presented in Sydney, 10th March 1982 by Adam Graycar, Social Welfare Research Centre, University of New South Wales. Made available under the Creative Commons BY 4.0 (CC BY) Attribution license. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.description.abstractThe rates of chronic illness in all industrial societies are very high. Chronic conditions increase in incidence with age. The Australian Bureau of Statistics survey identified the extent of chronicity in Australia, classifying any person aged 65 or more who has an activity limitation. Activity limitations mean that people with chronic conditions need some form of social and medical support. It is not known how many people with activity limitations live in institutional care, how many live alone, or how many live with relatives. The important policy questions are to try to determine what sort of support mechanisms are feasible to ensure that quality of life is enhanced and that adequate care is made available. There has been a worldwide emphasis on family policy and that families ought themselves to take care of their dependent elderly. It is important to ensure that families in a caring situation are provided with adequate support.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright University of New South Wales
dc.subjectAgeingen_US
dc.subjectChronic illnessen_US
dc.subjectChronic conditionsen_US
dc.subjectCarersen_US
dc.subjectHome careen_US
dc.subjectNursing home careen_US
dc.titleWho are the carers ; what are their needs?en_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.rights.holderUniversity of New South Wales
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupGraycar, Adam: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2649-2229


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