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dc.contributor.authorGraycar, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-25T00:58:02Z
dc.date.available2019-02-25T00:58:02Z
dc.date.issued1984-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/39012
dc.descriptionSpeech presented to the National Council on the Ageing seminar "1984 and beyond", Washington DC, April 4-7 1984, by Adam Graycar, Director, Social Welfare Research Centre, University of New South Wales. This speech is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.description.abstractFor conventional reasons those aged 65 or more are regarded as constituting our population of elderly persons. 9.7% of Australia's population is aged 65 or more. Most are not in the labour force and thus rely for their security on past investments; government pensions and benefits and services; and their families. Some are fortunate in having a combination of all three, others survive on one or two of these. The population is ageing slowly and the implications of this for social security and health and social service provision have caused alarm in some government circles.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright University of New South Wales
dc.subjectAged Careen_US
dc.subjectAgeingen_US
dc.subjectElderly peopleen_US
dc.subjectAccommodation for the elderlyen_US
dc.subjectAgeing populationen_US
dc.titleAged care in Australia: conflicting issuesen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.rights.holderUniversity of New South Wales
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupGraycar, Adam: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2649-2229


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