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dc.contributor.authorButler, Karrie Men_US
dc.contributor.authorRamos, Joyce Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuchanan, Christina Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorDalleck, Lance Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-04T04:57:44Z
dc.date.available2019-03-04T04:57:44Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-15
dc.identifier.citationButler, K. M., Ramos, J. S., Buchanan, C. A., & Dalleck, L. C. (2018). Can reducing sitting time in the university setting improve the cardiometabolic health of college students? Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, Volume 11, 603–610. https://doi.org/10.2147/dmso.s179590en_US
dc.identifier.issn1178-7007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/39049
dc.descriptionThis work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), prediabetes, and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases linked with prolonged sitting has created a need to identify options to limit sedentary behaviors. A potentially simple approach to achieve this goal in the university setting is to provide students the option to stand during courses rather than sit. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of standing in the college classroom setting on cardiometabolic risk factors in a cohort of college students. Patients and methods: Healthy college students (n=21) who attended at least two courses per week (a minimum of 5 hours) in a specified university building with standing desks participated in a 7-week intervention that was divided into three phases: 3 weeks of standing, 1 week of washout (sitting), and 3 weeks of sitting. The participants (mean ± SD: age, height, weight, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio were 22.7±6.4 years, 174.3±10.0 cm, 70.6±14.3 kg, 23.0±3.0 kg/m2, and 0.76±0.05, respectively) were randomly assigned to the phase of intervention of which they should start (sitting or standing), and all participants engaged in sitting during the washout phase. Cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic equivalents (METs) were measured at baseline and weekly throughout the intervention. Results: Paired t-tests revealed significant differences (P<0.05) in all cardiometabolic risk factors between the 3 weeks of sitting and 3 weeks of standing time blocks. Moreover, MetS z-score was significantly improved (P<0.05) during the 3 weeks of standing (–5.91±2.70) vs 3 weeks of sitting (–5.25±2.69). The METs were significantly higher (P<0.05) during standing (1.47±0.09) than during sitting (1.02±0.07). Although there was considerable interindividual variability in the ∆ MetS z-score response, there was a 100% (21/21) incidence of a favorable change (ie, responders) in MetS z-score response. Conclusion: A standing desk in the classroom paradigm was found to significantly improve cardiometabolic health throughout a short 3 weeks time span. Increasing standing time in the classroom, and therefore lessening weekly sedentary behavior, could be a potential wide-scale, effective strategy for primordial prevention of cardiometabolic diseases.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherDove Pressen_US
dc.rights© 2018 Butler et al.en_US
dc.subjectinactivity physiologyen_US
dc.subjectprimordial preventionen_US
dc.subjectsedentary behavioren_US
dc.titleCan reducing sitting time in the university setting improve the cardiometabolic health of college students?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S179590en_US
dc.rights.holderButler et al.en_US
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupDalleck, Lance C: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3825-2874en_US


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