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dc.contributor.authorProvost, Alden Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWerner, Adrian Den_US
dc.contributor.authorPost, Vincent Eduard Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorMichael, Holly Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLangevin, Christian Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-10T06:25:19Z
dc.date.available2019-05-10T06:25:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-11
dc.identifier.citationProvost, A. M., Werner, A. D., Post, V. E. A., Michael, H. A., & Langevin, C. D. (2018). Rebuttal to ‘The case of the Biscayne Bay and aquifer near Miami, Florida: density-driven flow of seawater or gravitationally driven discharge of deep saline groundwater?’ by Weyer (Environ Earth Sci 2018, 77:1–16). Environmental Earth Sciences, 77(19). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12665-018-7832-5en_US
dc.identifier.issn1866-6299
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/39198
dc.description© The Author(s) 2018 This article is distributed under the terms of the Crea-tive Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creat ivecommons .org/licen ses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribu-tion, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en_US
dc.description.abstractA recent paper by Weyer (Environ Earth Sci 2018, 77:1–16) challenges the widely accepted interpretation of groundwater heads and salinities in the coastal Biscayne aquifer near Miami, Florida, USA. Weyer (2018) suggests that the body of saltwa-ter that underlies fresh groundwater just inland of the coast is not a recirculating wedge of seawater, but results instead from upward migration of deep saline groundwater driven by regional flow. Perhaps more significantly, Weyer (2018) also asserts that established hydrologic theory is fundamentally incorrect with respect to buoyancy. Instead of acting along the direction of gravity (that is, vertically), Weyer (2018) claims, buoyancy acts instead along the direction of the pressure gradient. As a result, Weyer (2018) considers currently available density-dependent groundwater flow and transport modeling codes, and the analyses based on them, to be in error. In this rebuttal, we clarify the inaccuracies in the main points of Weyer’s (2018) paper. First, we explain that Weyer (2018) has misinterpreted observed equivalent freshwater heads in the Biscayne aquifer and that his alternative hypothesis concerning the source of the saltwater does not explain the observed salinities. Then, we review the established theory of buoyancy to identify the problem with Weyer’s (2018) alternative theory. Finally, we present theory and cite successful benchmark simulations to affirm the suitability of currently available codes for modeling density-dependent groundwater flow and transport.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018en_US
dc.subjectCoastal aquiferen_US
dc.subjectSeawater intrusionen_US
dc.subjectSaltwater wedgeen_US
dc.subjectDensity-dependent flowen_US
dc.subjectVariable-density flowen_US
dc.subjectBuoyancyen_US
dc.titleRebuttal to “The case of the Biscayne Bay and aquifer near Miami, Florida: density-driven flow of seawater or gravitationally driven discharge of deep saline groundwater?” by Weyer (Environ Earth Sci 2018, 77:1-16)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s12665-018-7832-5en_US
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupWerner, Adrian D: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1190-1301en_US


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