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dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Deidre Den_US
dc.contributor.authorRawlings, Deben_US
dc.contributor.authorButton, Elizabeth Dioniciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTieman, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-03T02:33:55Z
dc.date.available2019-07-03T02:33:55Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-01
dc.identifier.citationMorgan, Deidre & Rawlings, Deb & Button, Elizabeth & Tieman, Jennifer. (2019). Allied Health clinicians' understanding of palliative care as it relates to patients, caregivers, and health clinicians: A cross-sectional survey. Journal of Allied Health. 48. 127-133en_US
dc.identifier.issn0090-7421
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/39266
dc.description© 2019 Journal of Allied Health and Association of Schools of Allied Health Professionals. This author accepted manuscript is made available following 12 month embargo from date of publication (June 2019) in accordance with the publisher’s archiving policyen_US
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The scope of hospice or palliative care has expanded since its inception, which has significant ramifications for the AH workforce. This study sought to elicit allied health (AH) clinicians' understanding and views about palliative care and its relevance to their clinical practice and to identify their educational needs. Results from analysis of free text survey responses to a single openended question from a larger survey are presented. METHODS: An online survey was distributed to AH clinicians via email lists for the CareSearch Allied Health Hub, Allied Health Professions Australia, and other groups. Descriptive statistics and content analysis of free text responses were used to analyse the data. RESULTS: A total of 217 AH clinicians responded to an email survey and 187 useable responses were analysed. Four themes were identified: 1) palliative care employs a client-centred model of care, 2) acknowledgement of living whilst dying, 3) interdisciplinary palliative care interventions provide active care in a range of domains, and 4) characteristics of palliative care teams and settings. CONCLUSION: AH clinicians plan an active role in physical, social, and psycho-spiritual care of palliative care patients and caregivers. Burgeoning numbers of palliative care patients in nonspecialist palliative care settings require AH clinicians to develop skills and competencies to work with people who have advanced disease.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAssociation of Schools of Allied Health Professionalsen_US
dc.rights© 2019 Journal of Allied Health and Association of Schools of Allied Health Professionalsen_US
dc.subjectAllied healthen_US
dc.subjectPalliative careen_US
dc.subjectSurveyen_US
dc.subjectClinical practiceen_US
dc.subjectCompetenciesen_US
dc.titleAllied Health Clinicians' Understanding of Palliative Care as It Relates to Patients, Caregivers, and Health Clinicians: A Cross-Sectional Surveyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderJournal of Allied Health and Association of Schools of Allied Health Professionalsen_US
dc.rights.licenseIn Copyright
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupMorgan, Deidre D: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8725-9477en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupRawlings, Deb: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8998-9403en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupTieman, Jennifer: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2611-1900en_US


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