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dc.contributor.authorOliver, Genevieve Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorStathis, Roy Men_US
dc.contributor.authorFurtado, João Men_US
dc.contributor.authorArantes, Tiago Een_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCluskey, Peter Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Janet Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Justine Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-06T02:50:28Z
dc.date.available2019-11-06T02:50:28Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationOliver, G. F., Stathis, R. M., Furtado, J. M., Arantes, T. E., McCluskey, P. J., … Matthews, J. M. (2019). Current ophthalmology practice patterns for syphilitic uveitis. British Journal of Ophthalmology, 103(11), 1645–1649. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2018-313207en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-1161
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/39316
dc.description© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019 This is the author accepted manuscript (post print) made available in accordance with publisher copyright policy.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Syphilitic uveitis is re-emerging alongside the systemic infection. In July 2017, an international group of uveitis-specialised ophthalmologists formed the International Ocular Syphilis Study Group to define current practice patterns. Methods 103 Study Group members based in 35 countries completed a 25-item questionnaire focused on case load, clinical presentations, use and interpretation of investigations, treatment and clinical indicators of poor prognosis. Results Members managed a mean of 6.1 patients with syphilitic uveitis in clinics that averaged 707 annual cases of uveitis (0.9%); 53.2% reported increasing numbers over the past decade. Patients presented to more members (40.2%) during secondary syphilis. Uveitis was usually posterior (60.8%) or pan (22.5%); complications included optic neuropathy, macular oedema and posterior synechiae. All members diagnosed syphilitic uveitis using serological tests (simultaneous or sequential testing algorithms), and 97.0% routinely checked for HIV co-infection. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was ordered by 90.2% of members, and 92.7% took uveitis plus Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test (VDRL) or fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test (FTA-ABS) to indicate neurosyphilis. Patients were commonly co-managed with infectious disease physicians, and treated with penicillin for at least 10–14 days, plus corticosteroid. Features predicting poor outcome included optic neuropathy (86.3%) and initial misdiagnosis (63.7%). Reasons for delayed diagnosis were often practitioner-related. 82.5% of members tested every patient they managed with uveitis for syphilis. Conclusion This comprehensive report by an international group of uveitis-specialised ophthalmologists provides a current approach for the management of syphilitic uveitis.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBritish Journal of Opthalmologyen_US
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT130101648en_US
dc.rights© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019en_US
dc.subjectOphthamologyen_US
dc.subjectSyphilitic Uveitisen_US
dc.subjectSyphilisen_US
dc.titleCurrent ophthalmology practice patterns for syphilitic uveitisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.grantnumberARC/FT130101648en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2018-313207en_US
dc.rights.holderAuthor(s) (or their employer(s))en_US
dc.rights.licenseIn copyright
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupSmith, Justine R: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4756-5493


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