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dc.contributor.authorChalmers, Alan F
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-24T01:01:40Z
dc.date.available2010-03-24T01:01:40Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationChalmers, Alan 2009. Aristotle on Atomism. In E. Close, G. Couvalis, G. Frazis, M. Palaktsoglou, and M. Tsianikas (eds.) "Greek Research in Australia: Proceedings of the Biennial International Conference of Greek Studies, Flinders University June 2007", Flinders University Department of Languages - Modern Greek: Adelaide, 55-62.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-0725811341
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/8066
dc.description.abstractTwo kinds of atomism emerged in the philosophy off the Presocratics. One kind was devised as a response to Parmenides and involved indivisible physical atoms. The other kind emerged in response to Zeno’s paradoxes and involved indivisible magnitudes that served as a barrier to the infinite division that led to those paradoxes. I argue, contrary to a range of positions to be found in the literature that Aristotle was aware of the distinction between the two kinds of atomism, did not attribute an atomism involving indivisible magnitudes to Democritus, and countered the two kinds of atomism with distinct kinds of arguments.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFlinders University Department of Languages - Modern Greeken
dc.subjectGreek Researchen
dc.subjectGreeceen
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.subjectAlan Chalmersen
dc.titleAristotle on Atomismen
dc.typeArticleen


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