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dc.contributor.authorBramwell, Murray Ross
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-02T02:13:31Z
dc.date.available2010-06-02T02:13:31Z
dc.date.issued2005-04-01
dc.identifier.citationBramwell, Murray 2005. The Power of Two Funny Men. Review of "The Pleasure of Their Company" by Shaun Micallef and Glynn Nicholas. 'The Adelaide Review', April, no.265, 20.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/8242
dc.description.abstractThere have been plenty of comedy double acts in recent times - HG and Roy, John Clarke and Bryan Dawe, Mick Molloy and Tony Martin, to name just a few. But, on first glance, Glynn Nicholas and Shaun Micallef seem an unlikely combination. For a start, Nicholas has forged a very successful career as a solo comic with a memorable range of signature characters and impressive physical skills. Shaun Micallef, on the other hand, has for some time featured in television - in sketch comedy, the sitcom Welcher and Welcher and with a Tonight Show whose demise, many thought, had more to do with ratings panic than any lack of merit.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe Adelaide Reviewen
dc.subjectTheatre Reviewsen
dc.subjectDrama Reviewsen
dc.subjectTheatreen
dc.subjectDramaen
dc.subject.otherAustralian Standard Research Classification > 410102 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studiesen
dc.titleThe Power of Two Funny Men. "The Pleasure of Their Company" by Shaun Micallef and Glynn Nicholas. The Arts Theatre [review]en
dc.typeArticleen


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