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dc.contributor.authorPhiddian, Robert Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2006-02-08T02:52:19Z
dc.date.available2006-02-08T02:52:19Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier.citationPhiddian, Robert 1998. Was it merely Tweedle Dum and Tweedle Dee? Political Satire in the 1996 Australian Federal Election. 'Meanjin', vol.52, no.2, 278-298.en
dc.identifier.issn0815-953X
dc.identifier.issn0025-6293
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/862
dc.descriptionCopyright © The author(s) - Australianen
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses primarily on the cartoonists operating in major daily newspapers rather than on the periodical and electronic media. The thing that most obviously needs to be explained in a survey of political satire in the 1996 election is what it was that kept satirical passion at bay. The three basic reasons that satire remained relatively tame during the campaign were (1) the sense that the election was a form of entertainment put on by experts for the benefit of the voters, (2) the pressures on the media (including satirists) to be even-handed, and (3) the failure of the arch-satirist of Australian political life, Paul Keating, to start a good brawl.en
dc.format.extent1041499 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Melbourneen
dc.rightsCopyright © The author(s)
dc.subjectSatireen
dc.subject.classification420200en
dc.subject.classification420202en
dc.titleWas it merely Tweedle Dum and Tweedle Dee? Political Satire in the 1996 Australian Federal Electionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderThe author(s)
dc.rights.licenseIn Copyright
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookupPhiddian, Robert Andrew: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8413-991Xen_US


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